Biology

UWindsor biologist Barbara Zielinski and team. From left to right: Front row: Gillian Hughes, Dr. Barbara Zielinski, Jenna Jones, Kaela Scott, Dr. Michelle Nevett.  Back row: Tina Suntres, Georgette Nader, Gianfranco Grande, Alexandra Zygowska, Karl BoyesUWindsor biologist Barbara Zielinski and team. From left to right: Front row: Gillian Hughes, Dr. Barbara Zielinski, Jenna Jones, Kaela Scott, Dr. Michelle Nevett. Back row: Tina Suntres, Georgette Nader, Gianfranco Grande, Alexandra Zygowska, Karl Boyes.

Working to eradicate invasive species

A UWindsor biologist and students use pheromone research to outsmart the invasive sea lampre, an eel-like fish in the Great Lakes.

Lincoln SaviLincoln Savi, a master’s student in biology, is the founder of Savi Made, which produces realistic, hand-painted, 3D printed animal models.

“Making cool stuff” aim of student entrepreneur

MSc candidate Lincoln Savi is the founder of Savi Made, which produces realistic, hand-painted, 3D printed animal models.

Dan Mennill holding tropical wrenBiology professor Dan Mennill with a rufous-and-white wren. He led a 15-year study showing that warm temperatures reduce survival of this tropical bird. (Photo by Dale Morris.)

Hot climate reduces survival of tropical birds, study finds

A 15-year study led by University of Windsor researchers shows that a hot climate reduces survival in tropical birds.

UWindsor biological sciences PhD student Katrina Switzer is working with 3D-printed yellow toads in the forests of Costa Rica to see how females choose among similarly coloured males.UWindsor biological sciences PhD student Katrina Switzer is working with 3D-printed yellow toads in the forests of Costa Rica to see how females choose among similarly coloured males.

Researchers use 3D printed toads in the wild

When the rains eventually blanket northwest Costa Rica, ushering in the country’s wet season, a booming chorus of yellow toads will fill the tropical forest.

And the moment that rain starts to fall, UWindsor’s Katrina Switzer will race to a pond in Santa Rosa National Park where she’ll match 3D printed “Robotoads” with unsuspecting mates.

“The Neotropical Yellow Toads have a large breeding event that really only happens once a year during the first massive rainfall,” Switzer explained, adding the rain usually starts falling in the middle of the night.

University of Windsor professors Phillip Karpowicz and Christina Semeniuk received the Early Researcher Awards from the Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science.University of Windsor professors Phillip Karpowicz and Christina Semeniuk received the Early Researcher Awards from the Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science.

Science professors honoured with Early Researcher Awards

Two University of Windsor professors are among this year's recipients of the Early Researcher Awards, a provincial program that helps institutions build research teams.

Biology professor Phillip Karpowicz and Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research professor Christina Semeniuk were both awarded $150,000 over five years from the Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science.