History

Sandy AntalRetired Canadian Forces Major and historical researcher Sandy Antal will deliver a free public lecture Thursday about the Patriot attacks on Southwestern Ontario in the late 1830s.

Patriot attacks in Essex-Kent subject of historical lecture

Despite a massive level of discontent that existed in Essex-Kent in the late 1830s, people here were still not dissatisfied enough to side with attacking “Patriots” from the United States who were trying to drive the British right out of North America, according to a visiting author who will lecture here on Thursday night.

Film screening an opportunity to air memories of Windsor war veterans

A question-and-answer session with veterans of the Canadian Forces will follow a free public screening of the documentary “The Veterans’ Memories Project,” Tuesday, April 9, at 4 p.m. in Vanier Hall’s Winclare A.

The film, produced by the Windsor Historical Society, showcases veterans and examines their involvement in conflicts from World War II to Afghanistan.

Discussion of Roman gladiators to open classics conference

A keynote address entitled “Investing in Death: Gladiators as Investment and Currency in the Late Republic” will open the eighth annual University of Windsor Undergraduate Classics Conference, Friday, March 1, at 4 p.m. in Alumni Hall’s McPherson Lounge.

The public is invited to the free lecture, by York University history professor Jonathan Edmondson.

Lecture to explore early European use of Belle Isle

During the New France era, French settlers in the Detroit River region used Belle Isle for pastures, much as their Quebecois ancestors used islands in the St. Lawrence River.

In both regions, these pastures were used collectively and called “commons,” says historian Guillaume Teasdale. As he explains in his free public lecture on Wednesday, their fates diverged after the conquest by the British.

Very merry awards celebrate service and teaching in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Jennifer Rocheleau, secretary to then history department, made a most deserving recipient of an award recognizing staff service in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, professor Miriam Wright told attendees at the faculty’s end-of-year celebration, Wednesday in Vanier Hall.

Author to show Canadian history through eyes of social activists

Canadians usually learn about their history from the perspective of rulers—from the top down. Author Scott Neigh aims to explore the perspectives of ordinary people—from the bottom up.

“Whatever liberty and justice that communities, workplaces and individuals in Canada enjoy are due to the many struggles and social movements in our country’s history,” says Neigh. “Yet the stories and histories of those movements to overcome racism, sexism, and poverty, for example, remain largely untold, thanks to the single, simplistic national story taught to us in school.”

Lecture to trace Tecumseh’s quest to secure native homeland

A free public event Wednesday, November 7, will discuss the efforts of native leader Tecumseh to secure a place for First Nations during the Anglo-American conflict leading to the War of 1812.

The Humanities Research Group presents “Tecumseh and the Quest for a Native Homeland,” at 4 p.m. Wednesday, November 7, in Alumni Hall’s McPherson Lounge.

Historian Sandy Antal’s presentation will