Women’s and Gender Studies

Betty Barrett and Dana LevinBetty Barrett and Dana Levin analyzed hundreds of hours of World Wrestling Entertainment programming. Their findings are significant given the number of young people who form their ideas about relationships based on the media they consume.

'PG era' wrestling narratives still portray women negatively, researchers find

Despite marketing itself as ‘PG Era’ programming, World Wrestling Entertainment still portrays romantic relationships in which women are weak.

Renee BondyRenee Bondy holds up a copy of the book in which her essay was published.

Liberal nuns inspired 'unruly' feminist writer

Growing up in a fairly liberal Roman Catholic family in the 1970s, Renée Bondy only ever heard stories about severe nuns in black habits, but still learned to dread them in the same way a child might fear an unseen monster under her bed.

The nuns she grew up with played acoustic guitar, looked like Joan Baez, and wore comfortable shoes and groovy wooden crosses on leather lanyards.

Event to highlight women performers

Phog Lounge is the setting for Smash the Glass, an evening of voice and action for women’s studies students, Thursday, October 17.

Events to celebrate International Women’s Day 2013

Two events on campus this week will celebrate International Women’s Day.

A panel discussion Monday, March 25, will break open historical, theoretical and activist perspectives in 21st-century debates on weight, size, space and women’s bodies.

“Fat is still a feminist issue” will continue the discussion ignited by Susie Orbach’s best-selling book.

Rights of Aboriginal women subject of Tuesday discussion

Until 1985, First Nations women who married non-status men lost their status under Canada’s Indian Act, even though men who married non-status women were able to pass their status on to their wives and children. The effects of this discrimination are still being felt in many communities today.

In a free public event, “Aboriginal Women v. Canada,” Jeannette Corbière Lavell and Dawn Lavell Harvard discuss the losses experienced by First Nations women and their children as a result of gender discrimination in the Indian Act.