Stephanie Gouin, Arjel Franklin, Jamie Adjetey-Nelson, Steve Ray were inducted in the Alumni Sports Hall of Fame for their athletic achievements at the University of Windsor. Stephanie Gouin, Arjel Franklin, Jamie Adjetey-Nelson, Steve Ray were inducted in the Alumni Sports Hall of Fame for their athletic achievements at the University of Windsor.

Lancer grads inducted into alumni Hall of Fame

The 34th annual Alumni Sports Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony and Awards Presentation was held this weekend.

Following Sunday’s ceremonies, the Hall of Fame now boasts a distinguished membership of 135 inductees, 31 Sport Achievement recipients and 39 Team Achievement recipients.

Inductees in the Athlete category, recognized for their outstanding accomplishments as Lancer Athletes, include Jamie Adjetey-Nelson BA '07, BEd '09 - Track and Field, Arjei Franklin BHK '05, BEd '06 - Football, Stephanie Gouin BHK '99 - Track and Field and Steve Ray BASc '96 - Volleyball.

In the Administrator/Builder/Coach category, Assistant Sprints and hurdles coach Don Garrod BA '96, Lancer and beloved Lancer cross country coach Gary Malloy BA '83, BEd '84 (posthumously) were inducted.

Achievement awards were also bestowed on Joe Siddall BHK '07, Studio Analyst, Sportsnet Blue Jays Central Broadcast and the CIAU Women's Cross Country Team.

Visit uwindsor.ca/alumni to read more about the awards program and how to nominate. 

 

Third-year engineering student Zorka Globarevic served a co-op term at manufacturer Leggett & Platt under the supervision of director of quality Helder Sato.Third-year engineering student Zorka Globarevic served a co-op term at manufacturer Leggett & Platt under the supervision of director of quality Helder Sato.

UWindsor co-op programs win national accreditation

National accreditation of its graduate-level co-operative education programs demonstrates that the University of Windsor meets the highest standards, says Kristen Morris, manager of co-operative education and workplace partnerships.

Accreditation by Co-operative Education and Work-Integrated Learning Canada required a review of all aspects of co-operative education, from job readiness programming, administration of the program, employment rates and approval process, monitoring of the work site, and assessment post work term.

In addition to the initial accreditation of the eight master’s programs in computer science and engineering, the University received re-accreditation of 24 undergraduate programs in business, engineering, human kinetics, and science disciplines.

“Achieving accreditation is important to our team and the University. It lets our students and employer partners know that our co-op programs uphold high standards,” Morris says. “We are proud to share this news with our faculty partners, our employer partners, and of course our students.”

Co-operative education, within the Office of Experiential Learning, sees students alternate between periods of work and study, affording them the opportunity to put their classroom learning into practice and gain valuable industry experience.

Provost Douglas Kneale noted the key role community employers play in providing unique experiential learning opportunities: “If students want to get a leg up on their career readiness, the University of Windsor has the co-op ladder to get you there.”

Find more information, including a full list of accredited programs, on the UWindsor co-op website.

An Oct. 10 lecture in the ISC Culture Series will focus on the Middle East.An Oct. 10 lecture in the ISC Culture Series will focus on the Middle East.

Middle East culture subject of lunchtime lecture

Faculty, staff, and students interested in learning about the culture of the Middle East will get more than a lecture on Wednesday, Oct. 10, in the International Student Centre.

Presenters Amal Jammali, the centre’s office co-ordinator, and engineering student Ranim Al Joudi are planning their free lunchtime presentation as an immersive experience.

“In addition to general information like traditions, geography, and languages, we want to offer some fun activities such as dance and Arabic sweet tasting,” Jammali says.

The event is part of the ISC Culture Series hosted by the centre to inform students, staff, and faculty about some of the lands that are home to UWindsor students.

Attendees are welcome to bring a lunch to the brown bag event, which will run 12:10 to 12:50 p.m. in room 204, Laurier Hall. Advance online registration is encouraged but not required.

The series continues with sessions on India, Oct. 29, and China, Nov. 13. Sign up to express interest and receive an email reminder.

Cybersecurity Awareness Month: How to Spot Phishing Attempts

Cybersecurity Awareness Month: How to Spot Phishing Attempts

The University is targeted with fraudulent e-mails on a daily basis. Readers need to be constantly alert to the possibility that an e-mail is not legitimate.

Phishing Scams work by tricking you into clicking on a link or attachment in the e-mail that infects your machine or directs you to an imitation web site that steals your password. Sometimes the sender may want you to reply so that they can convince you to do something for them. Spear Phishing is a fraudulent message customized for a particular person or department. A common spear phishing scam targeting campus is the Gift Card Scam where you’re asked to buy gift cards for your boss and reply back with the activation codes.

How Do I Spot a Phishing Scam?

1. Think: Consider the request in detail. Is this normal or expected behaviour from this person?

2. Pause: The message has an unusual sense of urgency, requiring your immediate attention.

3. Identify: Check very carefully the sender’s name and email address. Does it look right?

4. React: Be warned by spelling errors, bad grammar, odd formatting, or missing signatures.

5. Links: When you hover over the link, the web address is suspicious.

6. Logins: The message asks you to log in or provide personal information to a website.

7. Files: There is an attachment you were not expecting, like an invoice.

You can see examples of phishing messages on the Cybersecurity Awareness website.

How Can I Avoid Getting Hooked by a Phishing Scam?

1. Call the sender to verify. If there's any doubt at all, make a call.

2. If you’re on a mobile device, wait until you’re on a computer so you can check more carefully.

3. Do not reply or act on unusual or out of character emails. Question urgency.

4. Do not open e-mail attachments or click links in suspicious e-mails. Hover the mouse over the link to reveal the real destination address.

5. Check the URL of login pages carefully! Make sure it is a login page you’ve used before.

What Should I do if I Suspect a Message is Phishing?

Please report a phishing scam or spam email by forwarding the message as an attachment to spam@uwindsor.ca or contact the ServiceDesk at ext. 4440.

Led by IT Services, Cybersecurity Awareness Month initiatives bring highlight cybersecurity issues relevant to the UWindsor community. More information, along with how you can protect yourself, can be found at uwindsor.ca/cybersecurity. This website will be updated regularly with best practices and current threats.

The Campus Food Bank needs donations of canned goods and non-perishable items to meet growing demand.The Campus Food Bank needs donations of canned goods and non-perishable items to meet growing demand.

Busiest year ever leaving student food bank short

Serving more clients than ever before is a mixed blessing at the Campus Food Bank, says manager Sandi Rose.

“On the one hand, it means students are getting the help they need,” she says. “But on the other hand, we keep running out of food.”

Rose says this year has seen unprecedented use of the food bank, which is maintained by Iona and Canterbury colleges in the basement of the Canterbury administrative building at 2500 University Ave. W. It provides basics and essential items to registered University of Windsor students free of cost.

“We are in urgent need of food or monetary donations,” she says.

Besides issuing a call for immediate assistance, she suggests that departments consider making the food bank a recipient of charity drives in the coming holiday season.

To make a contribution, contact Rose at sandir@uwindsor.ca or phone 519-253-3000, ext. 7039.

The Campus Bookstore sells natural skin care products handmade by UWindsor chef Andrew Braithwaite.The Campus Bookstore sells natural skin care products handmade by UWindsor chef Andrew Braithwaite.

Chef puts natural skin care products on bookstore menu

In his day job, Andrew Braithwaite is a chef with UWindsor Food Services, but his sideline cooking up handmade skin care products is also finding support on campus.

More than a dozen items in his Soap Chef line of soaps, lip balms, moisturizers, and sunscreen are available for purchase at the Campus Bookstore.

Braithwaite uses essential oils and natural ingredients to offer benefits beyond smelling good, promising anti-stress results “For healthy skin and a healthy mind.” And his made-to-order approach makes it possible to create specialty batches to meet client needs.

He expects some of his popular products, like charcoal soap for acne and oily skin, body butter for severe dry skin, and moisturizing lip balms to be “hot sellers in the coming winter weather.”

Find a list of Soap Chef products available in the Campus Bookstore, located on the lower level of the CAW Student Centre.