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Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research

Sharon LackieOperating the scanning electron microscope at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, Sharon Lackie helps researchers make breakthroughs in chemistry, biology, physics, engineering, environmental science, geology, and more.

Microscope technician looks into prehistoric discovery

When the Royal Ontario Museum needs to learn more about a 500-million–year-old fossil, it turns to UWindsor’s Sharon Lackie.

Hugh MacIsaac accompanies students from China’s Yunnan University on a boat tripUWindsor professor Hugh MacIsaac accompanies students from China’s Yunnan University on a boat trip to collect water samples from Lake Erie.

Visit anchors environmental exchange with Chinese university

Eight students from Yunnan University in China travelled to Windsor for a two-week course at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research.

John Hartig, visiting scholar at the University of Windsor's Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, has contributed to a report focused on waterfront remediation efforts.John Hartig, visiting scholar at the University of Windsor's Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, has contributed to a report by The International Association for Great Lakes Research focused on waterfront remediation efforts.

Visiting scholar contributes to Great Lakes revival study

What do the Detroit River, Toronto Harbour and New York’s Buffalo River all have in common?

These waterways were once among the 10 most polluted in the Great Lakes. Now they boast magnificent waterfronts and restored habitat for fish and wildlife. They are the pride of their communities, drawing residents and tourists alike.

Eight research vessels from the University of Windsor participated in the Harmful Algal Blooms Grab on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Scientists from the United States and Canada collected water samples to study the environmental stimuli responsible for toxic pEight research vessels from the University of Windsor participated in the Harmful Algal Blooms Grab on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Scientists from the United States and Canada collected water samples to study the environmental stimuli responsible for toxic production by the harmful algal blooms.

UWindsor researchers test the waters for harmful algae bloom

Scientists from UWindsor’s Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research fanned out across western Lake Erie Wednesday as part of a binational project to assess the danger posed by this summer’s algal bloom.