Marty Gervais

Book tells forgotten tales of Windsor

A free public reception Tuesday will launch the latest book by the University’s resident writing professional.

Ghost RoadGhost Road and other forgotten stories of Windsor is a new collection of local legends—only this is the Windsor we don’t know, says Marty Gervais. The best-selling author of The Rumrunners and My Town, he says these stories carry with them traces of the city’s weird and wonderful history.

BookFest roster boasts campus content

The University of Windsor will be well-represented at BookFest Windsor, October 25 to 27 at the Capitol Theatre and Arts Centre.

Members of the UWindsor faculty will join a number of alumni for the event, a celebration of the literary arts that will feature workshops and discussion, readings of poetry and prose, book signings and socials.

Among the professors—both past and present—who have committed to appear are Marty Gervais, Susan Gold, Karl Jirgens, Martha Lee, Nicole Markotić, Eugene McNamara and Stephen Pender.

City booster named Windsor’s poet laureate

Being named Windsor’s first poet laureate is a great honour, says Marty Gervais.

“I’m very proud of this community and I’m a great promoter of it and so for them to choose me to lead the way in this regard makes me feel great,” he said.

Windsor city council appointed Gervais, resident writing professional in the UWindsor English department and a publisher, columnist and poet, to the post November 28.

Councillor Percy Hatfield called him an outstanding choice.

Fast to benefit famine victims

Thirty hours without food cannot compare with the suffering of people in famine-stricken Somalia, says Candace Spencer, but it may help to relieve it.

The coordinator of the Womyn’s Centre is organizing the UWindsor 30-Hour Famine, part of a national effort to raise funds in relief of Somali refugees.

“I think everybody has seen what is happening in Somalia,” says the political science and women’s studies major. “We want to give them just a taste of how it is for these people day after day after day.”

Biologists hope nesting boxes attract swallows to research centre

If you build it, they will come.

That’s the hope of a team from the Department of Biological Sciences who installed 51 nest boxes at the University’s Pelee Environmental Research Centre on Saturday, August 27, to attract tree swallows, a blue-and-white species of songbird that breeds in the area.

“Tree swallows are an important part of our local bird community and they are excellent study animals,” said biology professor Dan Mennill, an ornithologist who helped to organize the project.