Civil and Environmental Engineering

Student projects bridge gap between theory and practice

Sometimes you have to fail to succeed. That’s the case with a project for third-year students in Amr El Ragaby’s class finite element for analysis and design.

The civil engineering professor challenges groups to design and build models of a truss bridge, predicting how they will react when subjected to pressure from a custom-built crusher. They are rewarded for designs that hold up well, and for accuracy in their analysis of the load capacity of their models.

Engineering prof joins accreditation board

Engineers Canada has appointed Waguih ElMaraghy, UWindsor professor of mechanical, automotive, and materials engineering, as a member-at-large on the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board.

He began a three-year term July 1.

The members of the board are volunteers drawn from academia, the public sector, and private industry, who develop criteria for the accreditation of the country’s undergraduate engineering programs.

Dr. ElMaraghy will attend the next meeting of the board Sept. 13 in St. John’s, N.L.

Engineering student’s energy retrofit evaluation tool gains recognition

Environmental engineering master’s candidate Rania Toufeili placed second at the Canadian Network of Asset Managers student research.Environmental engineering master’s candidate Rania Toufeili placed second at the Canadian Network of Asset Managers student research.

How does a building manager decide which energy retrofit is the most economical and least impactful on occupants and the environment?

Rania Toufeili has the answer. A master’s student of environmental engineering, she has designed an asset management decision support tool that can assist building managers in selecting the preferred technically feasible energy retrofit. The support tool landed her second place at the Canadian Network of Asset Managers student research symposium held May 6 to 9 in Kelowna, B.C.

“Building energy retrofits are a very effective way to decrease the energy consumption of a building and in turn decrease global greenhouse gas emissions,” Toufeili says.

Her tool combines multi-criteria decision making with life cycle thinking to develop a more comprehensive and expansive retrofit evaluation method than others on the market. The evaluation considers the energy retrofit’s environmental, economic, social, and technical performance by using a set of relevant key performance indicators.

Toufeili was selected from approximately 30 student applicants and nine student symposium presenters studying topics connected to asset management.

Engineering faculty and students recognized for research excellence

Dr. Jill Urbanic receives an award in the category of Mid-Career Scholars/Researchers during the University of Windsor's annual Celebration of Excellence in Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity.
The University of Windsor recognized the accomplishments of more than a dozen engineering faculty and students at the school’s annual Celebration of Excellence in Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity.

The awards ceremony, held March 7 at Alumni Auditorium in the CAW Student Centre, recognized scholars and researchers university-wide in all stages of their careers.

“Today’s celebration is the sign of a thriving academic community, where people are flourishing in their research, scholarship and creativity, and receiving recognition and support for the extraordinary work they do,” said interim president Douglas Kneale.

“What is so impressive is our collective bench strength in research and scholarship. We have outstanding students, emerging scholars, and established researchers, singular efforts and large collaborative projects, local, provincial, national, and international honours and success across all disciplines.”

Lessons learned

Members of the Class of 1967 visit Essex College, formerly the engineering building: (L-R) Philip Waier, Joseph Cohoon, Henry Regts, David Strelchuk and Harold Horneck. Norm Becker not pictured.

WRITTEN BY NORM BECKER BASC ’67, PHD ’70 ON BEHALF OF HIS CLASSMATES FROM THE CIVIL ENGINEERING CLASS OF ’67, PICTURED ABOVE.

In Canada’s centennial year, 13 civil engineering graduates from Ontario’s newest public university entered into an unsuspecting world to compete for internship positions against those who graduated from older, more prestigious institutions.

In 2017, six members of the class returned to campus to rekindle friendships, poke fun at their convincing old men disguises, and offer the following observations and suggestions to those who are following in their footsteps.

Engineers are the primary life-support providers for the seven billion messy people crowded on planet Earth. They rely upon us to put science into action to satisfy their rapacious needs and to accommodate the estimated one billion newbies added to this planet every 12 to 15 years.

Their expectation is that these needs be satisfied not only quickly, safely and affordably, but sustainably as well. Welcome to our busy profession. Our effectiveness as engineering practitioners depends upon our ability to research, develop and apply the newest scientific discoveries and technological advances wisely.

Engineering projects demonstrate application of knowledge to real-world problems

​Claudia Lutfallah demonstrates her Capstone project for a crowd during UWindsor Engineering's Capstone Design Demonstration Day on July 27, 2018 at the Ed Lumley Centre for Engineering Innovation.

The exciting part of working on a project redesigning the intersection of California Avenue and Wyandotte Street is the possibility of seeing it implemented, says Emma Teskey.

A fourth-year civil engineering student, she was part of a group that suggested several changes to the pavement and traffic signalling systems that would make the crossing safer for pedestrians and smoother for vehicles.

It was one of more than 60 projects displayed by graduating engineering students during Capstone Design Demonstration Day, Friday in the Centre for Engineering Innovation.

Teskey and her teammates — Abigayle Diemer, Kailee Dickson, Curtis Lanoue, and Sarah Zaarour — suggested altering the traffic signals so that cars and trucks are stopped in all directions while pedestrians cross, a system known as the “pedestrian scramble.” They also proposed adding wide white stripes to the crosswalk pavement and relocating a transit stop so buses do not block the intersection.

Environmental engineering at UWindsor provides students with boundless opportunities

Christina Ure is completing her Master of Applied Science in Environmental Engineering.
Christina Ure is completing her Master of Applied Science in Environmental Engineering.With a foundation in environmental engineering, Christina Ure knows the future is hers to build.

That’s because her degree from the University of Windsor makes her adept in the valuable art of solving problems.

“As an environmental engineer, we do a lot of problem-solving work for some of the world’s biggest issues,” Ure said. “That gives us a really good base for other fields – whether that’s business, law or medicine.”