Mechanical Automotive and Materials Engineering

Clinic aids mechanical engineering faculty in patent for improving motorcycle steering

When Bruce Minaker, associate professor and acting department head in Mechanical, Automotive, and Materials Engineering at the University of Windsor, began initially exploring routes to patent his invention, he recalled a previous mechanical engineering student he had taught — now the director of the International Intellectual Property Law Clinic. Dr. Minaker reached out to clinic director Wissam Aoun, who responded with interest.

Minaker’s invention is a new style of front suspension for motorcycles. His idea sprouted from his time as a motorcycle rider and enthusiast, and after working with engineering students for many years as a project advisor for the senior capstone design course.

Minaker explains: “For many years, the telescopic fork has been the standard for motorcycle front suspensions, despite the fact that it has some well-known weaknesses. These include fork bending deflection under braking forces, the associated sliding friction that results when that bending occurs, and the reinforcement needed in the frame to counter the large bending loads near the steering head bearing.”

Symposium examines studies of sustainability

UWindsor’s Dr. Rupp Carriveau leads the CLEEN2040 Shift Energy Academy, a three-hour workshop designed for developers, utilities, service providers and researchers.

Nearly 100 local and international scientists, engineers, policy makers, industry leaders, and entrepreneurs gathered June 20 to 22 in the Ed Lumley Centre for Engineering Innovation to discuss recent advances in renewable energy generation, transmission, storage, and consumption.

The Energy and Sustainability 2018 Summit examined studies on climate change, waste and recycling, green buildings, green economy, and social sustainability and featured an electric conversion performance vehicle.

Program provides certification in multidisciplinary mechatronics

The multidisciplinary field of mechatronics integrates mechanical, electrical, and computer engineering to design and implement complex engineering and manufacturing systems.

A new collaboration with global tech giant Siemens has enabled the University of Windsor to launch a world-class industry certification in mechatronic systems.

The weekend Siemens Mechatronic Systems Certification Program focuses on key industrial skill areas such as electrical components, sensors, motor controls, programmable controllers, hydraulics, and pneumatics. In addition to teaching the technical knowledge, the program also stresses trouble-shooting and system-based technical thinking via hands-on training.

Students to hone engineering skills during three-month stints in UK

Abdul Abdul, Jonathan Byensi, Damir Ferhatovic, Ankit Bhat and Shreya Patki (L-R) will travel to the United Kingdom to take part in water treatment projects. (Laura George not pictured)

Six engineering students will spend the summer in the United Kingdom improving their research skills in water treatment and renewable energy technologies.

As part of the Canadian Queen Elizabeth (QE) II Diamond Jubilee Scholarships program, the third-year mechanical and civil engineering students will spend three months abroad collaborating on two separate projects with Aberystwyth Universityand the University of Surrey.

Ankit Bhat, Shreya Patki and Damir Ferhatovic, will travel to Guildford, Surrey to work with Dr. Martand Singhon a project that focuses on using concentrated solar power for sustainable water desalination — the removal of salts and minerals to produce water suitable for human consumption or irrigation.

“I find it very interesting to be working on something that will be used in our generation,” says Bhat. “Water scarcity is a major issue. If we can convert salt water to clean drinkable, potable water using sustainable energy, we can solve one of our world’s biggest problems in providing clean water around the globe.” 

Engineering students lauded for performance in and outside of the classroom

OPEFE Scholarship Recipients pose with Asif Khan, chair of the Windsor-Essex chapter of Professional Engineers Ontario, and UWindsor's Dr. Ofelia Jianu and Dr. Randy Bowers.

High academic performances and leadership skills landed 21 University of Windsor engineering students scholarships from the Ontario Professional Engineers Foundation for Education.

Asif Khan, chair of the Windsor-Essex chapter of Professional Engineers Ontario, awarded students on behalf of the foundation during a ceremony at the Ed Lumley Centre for Engineering Innovation for recipients who received scholarships in the past three years.

“For me, the most significant benefit has been that the financial support has allowed me to fully dedicate my time and energy into succeeding in my studies,” said Steven Vrantsidis, a recipient of the foundation’s $1,500 Entrance Scholarship.

The Ontario Professional Engineers Foundation for Education (OPEFE) is a charitable foundation run by a volunteer board of directors that provides scholarships to encourage engineering students to pursue careers in the profession. The scholarships are financed through donations from professional engineers in Ontario, as well as corporate and individual donations.

UWindsor researchers receive nearly $5.5 million to solve industrial challenges

A $5,488,206 grant through the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada’s (NSERC) Collaborative Research and Development (CRD) program will advance University of Windsor research onnon-destructive testing of materials and use of coatings for multiple industry sectors.

The project will be led by Dr. Roman Maev, director generalof UWindsor’s Institute for Diagnostic Imaging Research (IDIR) and physics professor, cross-appointed to the university’s Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering (MAME) Department. Dr. Andrzej Sobiesiak, head of the MAME department, will assist as co-principal investigator. 

The project, Novel Quantitive Nondestructive Quality Evaluation of Advance Joining and Consolidation Manufacturing Processes, will develop and test resilient coatings and tools for their application, as well as non-destructive ultrasonic testing methods that can be done on-site for efficiency.

UWindsor engineering students clinch three of four province-wide scholarships


Rania Toufeili (L) and Chrissy Ure (R), both environmental engineering MASc students and Adib Shamsuddin, an undergraduate mechanical engineering student in the automotive stream, will each receive a $2,500 scholarship towards their engineering education.

University of Windsor engineering students clinched three of four scholarships offered province-wide by the Ontario Society of Professional Engineers.

In partnership with The Personal Insurance Company, the society annually awards two undergraduate and two graduate students enrolled in engineering programs across Ontario. 

UWindsor’s Chrissy Ure and Rania Toufeili, both environmental engineering MASc students and  

Adib Shamsuddin, an undergraduate mechanical engineering student in the automotive stream, will each receive a $2,500 scholarship towards their engineering education.

The three were recognized for their academic excellence and volunteer activities on campus and in the community.

UWindsor students and alumni honoured by engineering community

Michael Cappucci, BASc ’11, was one of three alumni named the Top Three Under 30 by Windsor’s Engineering Month Committee during a ceremony April 13, 2018 at the Fogolar Furlan Club.

Several University of Windsor engineering students and alumni were honoured during a local celebration of the engineering profession.

Windsor’s Engineering Month Committee hosts an annual awards luncheon to “bring public awareness to the diversity and importance of the exciting fields of engineering and technology and invite prospective students to consider these professions,” said Tina Hawco, chair of the Engineering Month Committee.

The committee is comprised of engineers and technologists from local municipalities, consulting engineering firms, the University of Windsor, St. Clair College, professional associations and industry.

Priscilla Williams, a PhD candidate in the civil and environmental engineering department, Michael Cappucci, BASc ’11, and Aaron Blata, BASc ’14, were named the Top Three Under 30 during a ceremony April 13, 2018 at the Fogolar Furlan Club for demonstrating higher than average abilities to undertake engineering projects, outstanding work ethic and leadership early in their careers.

Hum generating buzz on the other side of the world

Journalist Takayo Nagasawa of Japan’s national public broadcaster NHK interviews engineering professor Colin Novak about the infamous Windsor Hum.

A University of Windsor engineering professor will be featured in a Japanese science show for his investigation into the source of the infamous Windsor Hum.

A camera crew from Japan’s national public broadcaster NHK made a special trip to campus April 16 to interview and film Colin Novak, an associate professor in the mechanical, automotive and materials engineering department.

Production co-ordinator Takayo Nagasawa said the segment will run as part of an episode focused on the sound of the cosmos and people who make data from sound.

“We found out about the Windsor Hum and we couldn’t tell the story without interviewing Dr. Novak,” she said during a break from filming in the university’s Centre for Automotive Research and Education.

UWindsorENG student represents UWindsor in provincial thesis competition

Liza-Anastasia DiCecco, mechanical, automotive and materials engineering master's student, presents during the Three Minute Thesis competition at the University of Windsor on March 26.

A UWindsor Engineering graduate student represented the University of Windsor at a provincial Three Minute Thesis competition.

Liza-Anastasia Di-Cecco, a master's student in Materials Engineering, presented her 3D printing research at the Ontario 3MT® competition final on April 19, 2018 at York University. 

Di-Cecco had three minutes and a single presentation slide to deliver her presentation titled "Move over plastic, we're 3D printing titanium." 

"In my research, I’m studying the material properties of pure titanium made through a specific 3D printing process using plasma fabrication," Di-Cecco said. "I’m concentrating on looking at their strength, hardness, and durability, while also looking at what’s happening at the microscopic level to characterise these parts."

Di-Cecco said 3D printing is expanding our ability to make parts and more complex items such as custom prosthetics and orthotics and lighter and more fuel efficient cars.

"Even advanced rocket fuel nozzles that might someday get us to Mars; The possibilities of this research are endless," she added.

Three UWindsor Engineering graduate students made it to the final six in the University of Windsor's Three Minute Thesis competition where Di-Cecco took home a second-place prize of $500.