Dr. Ian Swaine (Adjunct)

Dr. Ian Swaine (Adjunct Professor)

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Educational Background

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) – Cardiovascular studies, University of Leeds, 1986-1994
Bachelor of Science (BSc Hons) Sports Science, Liverpool John Moores University, 1978-1981

Current Position

Professor and Head of Sports ScienceHead of Centre for Sport Science and Human Performance
University of Greenwich,
Department of Life and Sports Science,
Medway Campus,
Central Avenue,
Chatham Maritime,
Kent, ME4 4TB.

+44 (0)20 8331 8241

Bio
Prof Swaine joined the Faculty in 2015 as an Adjunct Professor. He has a broad research interest, ranging from the assessment of exercise performance in athletes who specialize in different sports, to the health benefits of exercise. His PhD work (at the University of Leeds, Faculty of Clinical Medicine), focused on the cardiorespiratory responses to exercise in patients with heart disease. He has produced papers examining performance in a variety of sports including swimming, running and cycling. The majority of his early research papers were published in the field of ‘swimming science’ and especially focussed on simulated swimming. Prof Swaine even went on to develop and patent his own novel whole-body dry-land swimming ergometer, and is still involved with this area of research.

The main area of research interest that Prof Swaine is focused on currently is investigating the effects of isometric exercise training on resting blood pressure. He is involved in international collaborations in relation this work. Also, he has recently worked with a consultant surgeon to explore exercise rehabilitation programmes in patients who have undergone surgery for cancer and other illnesses. This work has been based at a local hospital in the UK and has received large grant funding support from the UK’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

Areas of Research Interest
• The effects of isometric exercise training on resting blood pressure
• The assessment of exercise performance in athletes (especially swimmers)
• Cardiorespiratory responses during simulated swimming
• Physical performance in a variety of sports (including running and cycling)
• Physical activity and health in children
• Exercise rehabilitation programmes in patients who have undergone surgery for cancer and other illnesses

Current Research Funding
NIHR RfPB (2015-2018). Development of a perioperative exercise intervention for patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery for cancer – The BETTER Project”. £405k.

Selected Publications
1. Owen A, Wiles JD and Swaine IL (2010) Isometric Exercise and resting blood pressure: A meta-analysis. J Hum Hypertension. 12: 796-800.
2. Ford P and Swaine IL (2011) Continuous versus accumulated brisk walking in 8-11 year old children. European Journal of Sport Science, 12: 89-95.
3. Zamparo and Swaine (2012) Mechanical and propelling efficiency in swimming derived from exercise using a laboratory-based whole-body swimming ergometer, Journal of Applied Physiology, 113: 584-594.
4. Millar PJ, McGowan CL, Cornelissen VA, Araujo CG, Swaine IL (2014). Evidence for the role of isometric exercise training in reducing blood pressure: potential mechanisms and future directions. Sports Med, 44(3):345-56.