Cara Fabre

(519) 253-3000 ext. 4089
 
I come to Women’s and Gender Studies from teaching literature as a powerful mobilizer of social change and from doing community-based anti-poverty and transformative justice work. Rooted in anti-racist feminist principles, my teaching, research, and organizing strive to balance an analysis of how our everyday experiences are shaped by systems of privilege and oppression with learning tools and strategies for individual and collective action for social justice.
 
I am eager to engage with students’ experiences, questions, hopes, and fears about their social worlds by fostering learning environments that offer knowledge and skills necessary to develop and express their feminist voice and action.
 
Email wgst@uwindsor.ca to see what I'm teaching next or look for me teaching these courses:
  • Social Justice in Action
  • Everyday Disputes and their Resolution
  • Exploration of Feminist Voice
  • Restorative Justice
Recent publications:
 
Challenging Addiction in Canadian Literature and Classrooms (University of Toronto Press, forthcoming November 2016)
 
Comack, Elizabeth; Cara Fabre; and Shanise Burgher. “The Impact of the Harper Government’s ‘Tough on Crime’ Strategy: Hearing from Frontline Workers.” Manitoba: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2015. https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/impact-harper-governments-tough-crime-strategy
 
“‘This hunger is DNA you cannot undo’: Anorexia, Individualism, and Economically-Oriented Subjects in Ibi Kaslik’s Skinny.” ESC: English Studies in Canada 40.2-3 (2014): 83-107.
 
 “From Cultural Transformation to Systemic Revolution in Dionne Brand’s thirsty and Inventory.” MaComère: 2012 Special Issue on Dionne Brand 14.1-2 (2013-14): 99-121.
 
“‘There’s a treatment centre where the residential school used to be’: Alcoholism, Acculturation, and Barriers to Indigenous Health in Eden Robinson’s Monkey Beach.” Studies in Canadian Literature/Études en littérature canadienne. 38.2 (2013): 126-46.
 
Documentary Series in Progress:
Unmanageable: Incarcerating Youth In Ontario