Beverly Jacobs

people standing in line“Lacrosse as Medicine,” Monday at the Faculty of Human Kinetics, included a hands-on workshop in the Dennis Fairall Fieldhouse. Leading the workshop was Windsorite Rain Whited and his long-time friend and professional lacrosse player Kellen LeClair of the Buffalo Bandits.

Event highlights importance of lacrosse in Indigenous culture

Rain Whited was just four when his father thought he was old enough to begin playing organized sports.

“He asked me, ‘Do you want to play hockey or lacrosse?’ I didn’t even know what lacrosse was but I said, ‘Lacrosse.’ I think it was the Creator guiding me.”

For Whited, a member of the Oneida Nation of the Thames, lacrosse went on to become an integral part of his life. He played for the Windsor Warlocks, Windsor Clippers, and Wallaceburg Red Devils until he aged out of competitive leagues locally at 21.

Alan Ojig CorbiereAlan Ojig Corbiere, Canada Research Chair in History of Indigenous Peoples of North America, will present “Back to Basics: the Anishinaabe Understanding of the Covenant Chain and the 1764 Treaty of Niagara” on Nov. 11 in the Leddy Library Collaboratory.

Foundational treaty subject of Friday presentation

“Back to Basics: the Anishinaabe Understanding of the Covenant Chain and the 1764 Treaty of Niagara” on Nov. 11 in the Leddy Library.
Indigenous Knowledge Keepers, administrators, and student-athletes on the stageIndigenous Knowledge Keepers, administrators, and student-athletes took to the stage Tuesday at the Windsor International Film Festival for a panel discussion before a screening of “Indian Horse.”

Film panel discussion encourages action in Truth and Reconciliation

A pre-film discussion Nov. 1 at the Windsor International Film Festival featured Indigenous Knowledge Keepers, administrators, and athletes.