Languages

Lancer game Saturday to feature fun for football fans

Saturday’s football game offers more than the opportunity to watch the Lancer team—ranked seventh in the nation after Monday’s lopsided victory over Ottawa—take on the Guelph Gryphons under the lights on Alumni Field.

It also marks the Windsor debut of the NFL on Campus, a program of the American professional football league offering interactive games, promotions and prizes for young fans.

Youth conference to address issues of African diaspora

The African Diaspora Youth Conference changed Shauntae Robinson-Weekes’ life, giving her the courage to pursue post-secondary education. She attended in 2008 as a grade 11 student Toronto’s Oakwood Collegiate Institute.

“I had never been on a university campus before,” says Robinson-Weekes, just finished her second year of studies in French and psychology at the University of Windsor. She says she had been afraid she couldn’t afford university until she saw the example of so many of the event’s organizers and speakers.

Annotated text bears light on early modern Italy

Among the effects of the McGregor-Cowan House in Old Sandwich that entered the used-book market in Windsor was an annotated copy of Giovanni Battista Benedetti’s collected works, his Speculationum Liber (Venice edition of 1599).

Classics professor Robert Weir will examine the insights that this book and its annotations can shed on the intellectual climate of Italy circa 1600 in a free public lecture Wednesday, April 4, at 6 p.m. in Assumption University’s Freed-Orman Centre.

Lecture to examine impromptu tradition in performance

The Humanities Research Group presents Domenico Pietropaolo delivering a free public lecture entitled “Text and the Impromptu Tradition,” Thursday, February 9, at 7 p.m. in Assumption University’s Freed-Orman Centre.

Dr. Pietropaolo is principal of St. Michael’s College at the University of Toronto, holds the Goggio Chair in Italian Studies and is chair of the Italian studies department. He is also a professor of drama and is cross-appointed to the Graduate Centre for Study of Drama, the Centre for Comparative Literature and the Centre for Medieval Studies.

Lecture to address Futurist revolution in the arts

When the Italian poet and writer F.T. Marinetti published his Manifesto of Futurism on the front page of Le Figaro in February 1909, he launched the first real revolution in the arts, says Jean-Pierre de Villers.

UWindsor professor emeritus of languages, literatures and civilizations, Dr. de Villers will address this revolution in a free public presentation on Wednesday, October 19, at 3:30 p.m. in Assumption University’s Freed-Orman Centre.