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students stroll on sidewalk in front of Dillon HallStretching from the Stephen and Vicki Adams Welcome Centre to the Leddy Library, Alistair MacLeod Walk will be a tribute to one of our University’s most acclaimed scholars, says president Alan Wildeman. Photo by James Brittain.

Campus walkway to pay tribute to late scholar

The portion of the former Patricia Road that passes Dillon Hall will bear the name of one of the University of Windsor’s most acclaimed scholars, Alistair MacLeod, president Alan Wildeman announced Wednesday.

Professor MacLeod, who died in April 2014, taught English and creative writing at the University of Windsor for more than three decades. His literary career included the 1999 novel No Great Mischief—winner of the 2001 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the Trillium Book Award and the Lannan Literary Award—as well as the short story collections The Lost Salt Gift of Blood (1976), As Birds Bring Forth the Sun and Other Stories (1986), and Island (2000).

In 2000, MacLeod was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and in 2007 he was appointed an officer of the Order of Canada in recognition of his commitment to Canadian literature.

“Stretching from the Stephen and Vicki Adams Welcome Centre to the Leddy Library, Alistair MacLeod Walk will be a tribute to one of our University’s most acclaimed scholars,” Dr. Wildeman said. “It will also be a permanent reminder of the importance of literature and the humanities to a University, and of the power of creativity and the written word to guide us on our own personal journeys.”

Earlier this year, the University sought suggestions to rename two former streets now closed to vehicular traffic and forming important walkways through the campus. It announced last week that the pedestrian section of Sunset Avenue will be called Turtle Island Walk.

Official ceremonies in the fall will unveil signage identifying the walkways.

“Both events will be important opportunities to reflect on some of the extraordinary history, people, and endeavours that make the University of Windsor a unique and special place,” said Wildeman.