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Kayla SmithWindsor Law student Kayla Smith re-appeared before a Senate committee considering how to encourage young Canadians to volunteer in their communities.

Windsor Law student appears before Senate committee

In the midst of preparing for her final exams, third-year Windsor Law student Kayla Smith re-appeared before the Special Senate Committee on the Charitable Sector in Ottawa for its last meeting.

In roundtable discussion with senators and officials from non-profit organizations, Smith provided testimony and developed strategies on how to move forward in the voluntary sector. A particular topic she addressed is the role the federal government could play in encouraging younger Canadians to volunteer in their communities.

Smith was first invited to appear as an individual witness before the committee in May 2018. She was the youngest person in the room and the only student in attendance.

“I'm really grateful to the Senate, and to the co-chairs, Senator (Terry) Mercer and Senator (Ratna) Omidvar in particular, for showing us that there is essential value in the perspectives, opinions, and leadership of millennials and our rising youth,” Smith said. “I am very much looking forward to the policy changes to come that will strengthen Canada’s charities and non-profit organizations.”

The Special Senate Committee on the Charitable Sector met for the final time on April 8 to address the impact of public policy on charities and non-profit organizations. There are approximately 170,000 registered charities and non-profit organizations in Canada, which in 2015 reported $251 billion in revenue.

—Rachelle Prince

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