Communications, Media & Film

Film festival a learning experience for business students

The Odette School of Business has taken a large role in the Windsor International Film Festival again this year with the help of professor Vincent Georgie.

This will be the fourth year he has involved students in the festival and with 100 volunteers, it will be the biggest effort yet.

“I have had students work as much as 100 hours and take time off of work because they love it so much,” said Georgie.

Reading to reflect shared love of skating

A reading on Friday will bring together two UWindsor graduates to recall “It all started at Riverside Arena.”

Laurie Smith (BA 1991, B.Ed 1993, BA 1995, MA 1996) recounts that she and Kevin Shea (BA 1977) have been friends since the first day of Grade 1.

“Growing up in the shadow of Riverside Arena, we had no idea how important that rink would be in our lives as writers,” she says.

'Unwaged' work for social media sites a labour of love, new prof says

Despite the fact that social media web sites like Flickr are worth millions of dollars, the users who generate nearly all the content for them are surprisingly comfortable with their labour being “unwaged,” according to a new communications professor.

“The thought of someone else making money off their work doesn’t hold much sway with Flickr members,” said Brian A. Brown, an assistant professor who joined the department of Communication, Media and Film this fall.

Student’s solo exhibition explores relationship between virtuality and reality

In a technological age, what better way to explore the interplay between the online and offline worlds than through art that combines digital and mixed media?

A reception Thursday will celebrate the opening of Online | Offline: Artificial Perception in the Natural World, a solo exhibition by Nicole Beno, a fourth-year double major in visual arts and communications.

“Sometimes it seems the natural aspect of our lives as we give in to consumer society,” says Beno. “We ourselves are consumed by buying too much stuff.”

Gold medallist author of her own good fortune

In recommending Kate Hargreaves for the Governor General's Gold Medal, the department of English Language, Literature and Creative Writing described the two-time grad (BA 2010, MA 2012) as “the most talented and hard-working student we have had the pleasure to teach and mentor.”

Hargreaves received the medal as the top graduate student in her cohort at Saturday’s Convocation ceremonies.

Downtown community welcomes UWindsor campus plans

Downtown residents and merchants were excited by what they saw of the University’s plans during an open house Thursday at the Windsor Armouries.

“I think the value of my house is going to shoot up,” said Jon Liedtke, whose home on Victoria Avenue is within walking distance of the three buildings slated for the downtown campus. He was one of dozens of community members who turned out to view renderings, speak with University officials, and grill architects on the details.

Architects to be on hand for downtown open house

Representatives from the architectural firms planning the development of the UWindsor’s downtown campus will be on hand Thursday to discuss renovations to the Windsor Armouries, the former bus depot across the street and the Windsor Star complex several blocks to the west.

CS&P Architects and the heritage consulting firm E.R.A. Architects will present drawings and floor plans reflecting the vision which will bring approximately 1,500 students, faculty and staff into the heart of the city in 2014.

Tags: 

Open house to outline plans for downtown campus

The public will have a chance to say goodbye to the Windsor Armouries and view the University’s plans for its downtown campus during an open house in the building on Thursday, October 4.

The event will run 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the historical building, located on University Avenue at Freedom Way. UWindsor president Alan Wildeman, project managers, architects and representatives from the City of Windsor will be on-hand to discuss plans for the development of the Armouries, as well as the former bus depot across the street and the Windsor Star complex several blocks to the west.

Communications prof comes home for teaching assignment

Kyle Asquith has some intimate knowledge about how television markets products to children, but is also quick to dispel the widely accepted notion that it was the TV industry that invented the methods so commonly used today.

“There’s a misconception that marketing to children came in the television age,” says Dr. Asquith, the newest faculty member in the department of Communication, Media and Film. “Most companies already had the tactics and strategies of marketing to children nailed by the 1920s.”