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Undergraduate Students

University of Windsor women's basketball head coach Chantelle Vallée works with players during a practice on Jan. 31, 2018.University of Windsor women's basketball head coach Chantelle Vallée works with players during a practice on Jan. 31, 2018.

Value of same-sex coaches extends beyond the court, says UWin student

Taylor Imeson wants to see more women in head coaching positions.

Not only would it provide female athletes with same-sex mentors, but she says it would inspire future generations of female coaches to pursue the career.

"I had always noticed that women's sports were growing, but there were barely any female coaches," says Imeson.

"Participants felt they had the necessary skills and self-efficacy to coach, however, due to various reasons, a majority did not identify coaching as a career aspiration."

The Tea Party's Jeff Burrows performs at the Horse Shoe Tavern in Toronto while wearing one of Dr. Nadia Azar's BodyMedia Armbands. (Photo courtesy of Adrienne Jones/UWindsor)The Tea Party's Jeff Burrows performs at the Horse Shoe Tavern in Toronto while wearing one of Dr. Nadia Azar's BodyMedia Armbands. (Photo courtesy of Adrienne Jones/UWindsor)

Drummers wanted for online survey

Nadia Azar is looking for the particulars on the perils of being a percussionist.

The UWindsor associate professor of kinesiology has launched an online survey for drummers of all levels to gather information on playing-related pain and problems.

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UWindsor associate professor Jennifer Willet christens the new School of Creative Arts during Feasting the Lab on Jan. 20, 2018.UWindsor associate professor Jennifer Willet christens the new School of Creative Arts during Feasting the Lab on Jan. 20, 2018.

Professor blurs the lines between art and science

Jennifer Willet's art may evoke mixed feelings. And that's the point.

The associate professor at the University of Windsor specializes in bioart, a form of art that fuses scientific processes and materials in a gallery setting.

"It most often involves living, sometimes recently deceased biological material," Dr. Willet explained. "One of the things that really differentiates bioart from other art forms is the bioethics of the media are intrinsically present in the work of the artist and the viewer."

UWindsor's Christian Trudeau, Associate Professor in the Department of Economics, will be featured in an upcoming issue of Games and Economics Behavior.UWindsor's Christian Trudeau, Associate Professor in the Department of Economics, will be featured in an upcoming issue of Games and Economics Behavior.

Prof's work to be featured in journal commemorating Nobel Prize-winning economist

The University of Windsor’s Christian Trudeau says he’s honored to be featured in an upcoming special journal issue commemorating Nobel Prize-winning economist Lloyd Shapley.

The issue, scheduled to be published early this year in Games and Economics Behavior, will contain original research articles related to the many contributions Dr. Shapley made during his career.

“I had never met Dr. Shapley personally but I’ve read tons of his work,” Dr. Trudeau said. “To be associated, even as far as this to what he’s done, is a great honour.”

UWindsor professor Dr. Aaron Fisk received $15.9 million in funding for the Real-time Aquatic Ecosystem Observation Network.UWindsor professor Dr. Aaron Fisk received $15.9 million in funding for the Real-time Aquatic Ecosystem Observation Network.

UWindsor researcher champions collaborative freshwater research project

The Great Lakes will have a network of well-equipped guardians thanks to a plan hatched by a UWindsor researcher with funding from the Canada Foundation for Innovation and Ontario’s Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science and Ministry of Economic Development and Growth.

Aaron Fisk and his nine collaborators will receive $15.9 million for the Real-time Aquatic Ecosystem Observation Network (RAEON), a collaborative research project which will provide infrastructure and data management for Canadian scientists to carry-out cutting-edge research on freshwater ecosystems.

Christina Ure is completing her Master of Applied Science in Environmental Engineering.Christina Ure is completing her Master of Applied Science in Environmental Engineering.

Environmental Engineering builds students up for success

With a foundation in environmental engineering, Christina Ure knows the future is hers to build.

That’s because her degree from the University of Windsor makes her adept in the valuable art of solving problems.

“As an environmental engineer, we do a lot of problem-solving work for some of the world’s biggest issues,” Ure said.

“That gives us a really good base for other fields – whether that’s business, law or medicine.”

Jonkoping Foreign Exchange Student Ida Karlsson begins a semester long internship at UWindsor’s Office of Public Affairs and Communications.Jonkoping Foreign Exchange Student Ida Karlsson begins a semester long internship at UWindsor’s Office of Public Affairs and Communications.

Exchange student asks, 'are Canadians really that nice?'

Swedish exchange student Ida Karlsson says she thinks of the stereotypical Canadian as helpful, apologetic, and nice.

Proof positive was when Karlsson landed a free ride from the Windsor International Airport to the University after chatting with a woman during her Windsor bound flight.

While at the University of Windsor, she will be taking classes and generating content for one of the busiest social media channels in the city — the University's.

UWindsor President Alan Wildeman talks to a class on their first day in the new School of Creative Arts in downtown Windsor.UWindsor President Alan Wildeman talks to a class on their first day in the new School of Creative Arts in downtown Windsor.

School of Creative Arts comes to life in downtown Windsor

January 4, 2018 marked a historic moment for students, faculty and staff at UWindsor’s School of Creative Arts.

Over the last four years, the late-19th-century Romanesque structure in the city’s downtown core reverberated with the frenzied sounds of construction.

But on Thursday, the notes from students practising piano and lectures by professors in classrooms drifted up to fill the lofty Windsor Armouries.