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Research Matters

Dave YurkowskiPhD student Dave Yurkowski pulls a ringed seal into a boat in Resolute Bay, Nunavut.

Grad student travels to Arctic to study ringed seals

Mention seals to most Canadians and chances are their minds will immediately jump to the variety of harp seals that are controversially hunted on the east coast.

But the lesser known ringed seals are just as important to Canada’s Arctic, and a PhD student in the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research is devoting his research to studying their behaviour and how it may be changing as a result of climate change in the north.

Aaron Fisk and Nigel HusseyAaron Fisk, left, and Nigel Hussey, are two of the authors on a new journal paper which suggests it's time to reconsider standards used to classify organisms in to various categories in the food chain.

New paper challenges scientific beliefs about ecosystems

It’s time for conservation managers and those who do everything from set fishing quotas to establish how endangered and threatened species are listed to completely rethink how we regulate ecosystems, according to a pair of scientists who have authored a paper that challenges how organisms are classified in food webs.

Betty Barrett and Dana LevinBetty Barrett and Dana Levin analyzed hundreds of hours of World Wrestling Entertainment programming. Their findings are significant given the number of young people who form their ideas about relationships based on the media they consume.

'PG era' wrestling narratives still portray women negatively, researchers find

Despite marketing itself as ‘PG Era’ programming, World Wrestling Entertainment still portrays romantic relationships in which women are weak.
obese peopleAbout 25 percent of Canada's population is categorized as obese, but we need to be less obsessed with weight and more focused on promoting healthy living, according to Bill Bogart.

Combating obesity requires new approach, legal expert says

Rather than creating laws to help obese people lose weight, we need interventions that make people healthier, says a UWindsor law researcher.