Spotlight on Graduate Research

Cody Dey, a UWindsor post-doctoral researcher, says about 10 per cent of Arctic species have never been the subject of a published study.Cody Dey, a UWindsor post-doctoral researcher, says about 10 per cent of Arctic species have never been the subject of a published study.

UWindsor researcher finds Arctic species critically understudied

The focused scope of research in Canada’s Arctic potentially leaves dozens of species at risk, says a UWindsor post-doctoral researcher.

Cody Dey, currently studying in the Process-Driven Predictive Ecology Lab at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, said conserving Arctic wildlife poses a challenge because 10 per cent of birds, fish and mammal species have never been the subject of a published study.

UWindsor biological sciences PhD student Katrina Switzer is working with 3D-printed yellow toads in the forests of Costa Rica to see how females choose among similarly coloured males.UWindsor biological sciences PhD student Katrina Switzer is working with 3D-printed yellow toads in the forests of Costa Rica to see how females choose among similarly coloured males.

Researchers use 3D printed toads in the wild

When the rains eventually blanket northwest Costa Rica, ushering in the country’s wet season, a booming chorus of yellow toads will fill the tropical forest.

And the moment that rain starts to fall, UWindsor’s Katrina Switzer will race to a pond in Santa Rosa National Park where she’ll match 3D printed “Robotoads” with unsuspecting mates.

“The Neotropical Yellow Toads have a large breeding event that really only happens once a year during the first massive rainfall,” Switzer explained, adding the rain usually starts falling in the middle of the night.

Ian Thomas, biological sciences master's student, accepts his award from University of Windsor President Alan Wildeman, during the Three Minute Thesis competition on Monday, March 26, 2018.Ian Thomas, biological sciences master's student, accepts his award from University of Windsor President Alan Wildeman, during the Three Minute Thesis competition on Monday, March 26, 2018.

Biological sciences student soars in 3M Thesis Competition

The winner of this year’s Three Minute Thesis competition at the University of Windsor is examining how the chirping of the Savannah Sparrow may help researchers to better understand the development of human language.

Biological sciences master’s student Ian Thomas took home the $1,000 top prize and the chance to represent the University of Windsor at the Ontario 3MT competition final at York University on April 19, 2018.