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Pursue strengths in research and graduate education

Students address water supply, quality and infrastructure challenges

Installing green infrastructure in residential neighbourhoods can reduce stormwater run-off, mitigating the effects of climate change on sewer systems, says Zach McPhee.

His project modelling the benefits of “low-impact developments” in a Sault Ste. Marie subdivision was one of about 30 by graduate students in engineering on display Wednesday in observance of World Water Day.

Engineering students promote diversity and inclusion

At UWindsor Engineering, we believe that one of the most important ingredients for creative thinking is diversity. We are committed to fostering a respectful, fair, and inclusive learning and working environment for all of our students, faculty and staff. From all of us at the Faculty of Engineering, we would like to say #YouBelong.

Women account for an average of 19 per cent of engineering students in Canada, a participation rate essentially unchanged since 2013, says Eleane Paguaga Amador, president of the Women in Engineering Club and a third-year industrial engineering major.

Mechanical engineering students receive international research award

Mechanical engineering students at the University of Windsor have been recognized on an international stage for their research in designing a 3D printable hand brace that can assist people with connective tissue disorders.

Master’s student Andre Khayat and doctoral candidate Hamed Kalami received the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) Young Researcher Award after Khayat presented to an audience of industry leaders and academic researchers at the 12th IFAC Workshop on Intelligent Manufacturing Systems held Dec. 5-7, 2016 in Austin, Texas.

UWindsorENG student to help form startup using NASA technology

A team including a University of Windsor engineering student used NASA technology designed for Mars to become the only Canadian-based team to win part of the U.S. Space Race startup challenge.

Abhishek Chakrala, a 22-year-old electrical engineering masters student, was part of a seven-member team that won a $2,500 prize in one category by using a NASA invention to track weather. The team was named a finalist in another category where it pitched an idea to make electricity using a kite in remote locations.

Sergio Marchionne’s UWindsor visit leaves impression on engineering students

When you meet with an executive at the helm of one the largest automakers in the world, you expect him to mainly talk shop.

At least that’s what a group of automotive engineering students expected when they had a chance to spend time with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne on Nov. 17 at the University of Windsor. Instead, Dr. Marchionne fondly recalled his days as a UWindsor business student and told the eager graduate students in the Windsor-Torino-FCA exchange program to slow down and enjoy this “intellectually stimulating” part of their lives.

UWindsor research leads to revolutionary construction material

It could be another five years or more before University of Windsor engineering professor Sreekanta Das can start handing out the grades for his students’ latest school project.

“Five years for sure,” Das said of the time needed to definitively prove whether a revolutionary construction material can provide a cheaper and greener solution to future concrete and steel rehabilitation projects.

Environmental engineering at UWindsor provides students with boundless opportunities

Christina Ure is completing her Master of Applied Science in Environmental Engineering.
Christina Ure is completing her Master of Applied Science in Environmental Engineering.With a foundation in environmental engineering, Christina Ure knows the future is hers to build.

That’s because her degree from the University of Windsor makes her adept in the valuable art of solving problems.

“As an environmental engineer, we do a lot of problem-solving work for some of the world’s biggest issues,” Ure said. “That gives us a really good base for other fields – whether that’s business, law or medicine.”