Course Options Guide

Unsure on what to take? Use the following Course Options Guide to help you with your elective needs. 

Fall 2022 - TENTATIVE
 

ANTHROZOOLOGY


ANZO-1600. Animals and Humans in Society. Tuesday and Thursday from 10:00 AM - 11:20 AM in Toldo Health Education Centre, Room 200
This course will explore and consider the different types of relationships between animals and humans in contemporary society from a variety of physical, social, and psychological perspectives. Topics may include companion animals, animal rights and welfare, animals and food and entertainment, human-animal violence, and animal-assisted therapy. (CAn be taken for either Social Science or Arts credit). 
 

GENERAL ART


GART-1200. Understanding the Contemporary World. Tuesday and Thursday from 1:00 PM - 2:20 PM in Erie Hall, Room 3123
This course will explore current political, cultural and social contexts. The perceived gulf between the "ivory tower" and the "real world" will be bridged each week as we analyze major current issues with attention to popular culture. (Restricted to year 1 FAHSS majors.) (3 lecture/1 tutorial hours a week.) (6.0 credit course.)


GART-1210. An Introduction to Indigenous Topics. Asynchronous Online
This course introduces stuents to Indigenous histories, perspectives, and modern realities through an Indigenous lens. The role of colonization is introduced to Indigenous relationships on Turtle Island changed as a result of cntact and colonizatin. This survey course provides a learning opportunity for students to engage in Indigenous pedagogy and worldview as they learn how history impacts the contemporary lives of Indigenous people. Through exploring relaitonships, this course engages critical reading, writing and thinking skills through course lectures and seminar activities. The history of relations assists in understanding how colonization's policies and statutory documents thereafter affected Indigenous peoples, such as the Royal Proclamation, Treaties, the Indian Act, the British North America Act (1867), and the Constitution Act (1982). Today, these colonial-state governance documents are a significant part of Indigenous-Crown and Indigenous-settler relations. (2 lecture hours and 1 tutorial hour per week.)(Also offered as SOSC-1210.) 
 

GART-1500. Effective Writing I. Various Sections
A foundational course aimed at developing effective writing skills for communicating ideas in academic and other contexts. Topics may include grammar, paragraphs writing conventions, academic learning, and critiacl thinking. This is a hybrid course. 


GART-2090. Ethics in the Professions. Tuesday and Thursday from 11:30 AM - 12:50 PM in Chrysler Hall South, Room 51
Examines what constitutes a profession, its legitimacy, and its authority from society. The responsibilities of professionals to their clients, professions, and society are mapped. Codes of ethics and other statements of ethical standards, conflict of interest, and the roles of regulatory bodies and governments are examined and related to practice through relevant case studies.


SOCIAL JUSTICE STUDIES


SJST-1000. Social Justice in Action. Monday and Wednesday from 2:30 PM - 3:50 PM 
Students investigate the local and global origins of a contemporary social problem through the eyes of social justice activists. Students will assess the strengths and limitations of strategies and theoretical frameworks for social change and use this knowledge to create social action messages that raise public awareness, influence government or corporate policy, or positively change attitudes and behaviours. (3 lecture hours per week) (Also offered as DISB-1000.)

SJST-2180. Everyday Conflicts and Their Resolution. Tuesday and Thursday from 10:00 AM - 11:20 PM in Dillon Hall, Room 264
Students design and practice techniques for resolving everyday conflicts with friends and co-workers effectively and respectfully, and without damaging interpersonal relationships. Students learn to focus on the problem, not the person; identify and respond to hidden agendas and subvert personal attacks. Pre-requisite: Semester 3 or above standing or permission of the instructor. (Also offered as PSYC-2180 and WORK-2180).

GENERAL SOCIAL SCIENCE


SOSC-1210. An Introduction to Indigenous Topics. Asynchronous Online
This course introduces stuents to Indigenous histories, perspectives, and modern realities through an Indigenous lens. The role of colonization is introduced to Indigenous relationships on Turtle Island changed as a result of cntact and colonizatin. This survey course provides a learning opportunity for students to engage in Indigenous pedagogy and worldview as they learn how history impacts the contemporary lives of Indigenous people. Through exploring relaitonships, this course engages critical reading, writing and thinking skills through course lectures and seminar activities. The history of relations assists in understanding how colonization's policies and statutory documents thereafter affected Indigenous peoples, such as the Royal Proclamation, Treaties, the Indian Act, the British North America Act (1867), and the Constitution Act (1982). Today, these colonial-state governance documents are a significant part of Indigenous-Crown and Indigenous-settler relations. (2 lecture hours and 1 tutorial hour per week.)(Also offered as SOSC-1210.) 

SOSC-2500. Basic Quantiative Methods. Wedensday from 7:00 PM - 9:50 PM in Erie Hall, Room 1120
Introduction to measurement of variables, organization and description of numerical data, testing hypotheses, inference, and interpretation of findings in the Social Sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, normal distribution, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, t-tests, correlation, and chi- square tests. (Antirequisite: STAT-2910, STAT-2920, STAT-2950, MSCI-2020, GENG-2220, and KINE- 2690.)

SOSC-3150. On Death and Dying. 
A critical exploration of topics related to death and dying. Topics covered may include: historical and cross-cultural perspectives on dying and death; memorial and commemoration; palliative care and medical aid in dying; death and popular culture; genocide and mass deaths; pandemics; the construction and medicalization of death; and death planning. Course delivery may vary according to instructor preference. (Pre-requisites: Semester 5 or higher standing or permission of instructor). (Cross-listed with SACR-3150)

WORK AND EMPLOYMENT ISSUES


WORK-1000. Labour and Scial Movement in Canadian Society. Tuesday and Thursday from 2:30 PM - 3:50 PM in Biology Building, Room 121
An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of labour and social movements, focussing on their efforts to address the needs of workers, women, gays and lesbians, social and ethnic minorities, students, and the poor.

WORK-2000. Labour Law and Worker's Rights. Tuesday and Thursday from 1:00 PM - 2:20 PM in Biology Building, Room 113
This course examines the everyday application of employment law and human rights legislation to workplace issues. Students investigate the rights and responsibilities of workers and employers in unionized and non-unionized environments.

WORK-2180. Everyday Conflicts and Their Resolution. Tuesday and Thursday from 10:00 AM - 11:20 PM in Dillon Hall, Room 264
Students design and practice techniques for resolving everyday conflicts with friends and co-workers effectively and respectfully, and without damaging interpersonal relationships. Students learn to focus on the problem, not the person; identify and respond to hidden agendas and subvert personal attacks. Pre-requisite: Semester 3 or above standing or permission of the instructor. (Also offered as PSYC-2180 and SJST-2180).




Intersession/Summer 2022 


FAHSS


GART-1500. Effective Writing I. Tuesday from 10:00 AM - 11:20 AM 
A foundational course aimed at developing effective writing skills for communicating ideas in academic and other contexts. Topics may includegrammar, paragraph writing conventions, academic learning, and critical thinking.This is a hybrid course.

DRAMA


DRAM-2100. Speech Communication to Inform. Monday/Wednesday from 5:00 PM - 7:50 PM in Dillon Hall 253 
A beginning course designed to help the student to develop poise and confidence in communicating information. (2 lecture hours and 1 laboratory hour per week.) (Not available on an Audit basis.). 

ENGLISH 


ENGL-2530. Shakespeare in Performance. 
Studies in selections of Shakespearean drama in performance. (Prerequisite: Semester two standing.) (May be repeated for credit.)

PHILOSOPHY


PHIL-1290. Contemporary Moral Issues. 
A critical examination of philosophical arguments about controversial moral issues. Readings will be chosen by the instructor on issues connected with one or several areas such as: biomedical ethics, euthanasia, suicide, environmental ethics, the treatment of animals, war and violence, pornography, censorship. Some non-Western Philosophical sources may be used.

PSYCHOLOGY


PSYC-1150. Introduction to Psychology as a Behavioural Science. Monday/Wednesday from 8:30 AM - 11:20 AM in Toldo 200
Introduction to selected areas in psychology including learning, perception, physiological psychology, emotion, and motivation.

PSYC-2230. Developmental Psychology: The Child. Tuesday/Thursday from 1:00 PM - 3:50 PM in Toldo 100 
The study of normal child development from conception to puberty, including physical, cognitive, and social development within the child's family, school, and cultural contexts. Specific topics include temperament, language development, intelligence testing, personality development, and parenting styles.

PSYC-2280. Psychological Disorder. Monday/Wednesday from 1:00 PM - 3:50 PM in Toldo 104
This course is a survey of psychopathology, with a focus on the structure and application of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of Mental Disorders. Content to be covered will include historical and contemporary theory and research regarding the etiology and progression of abnormality, including biological, psychological and socio-cultural understandings. Attention will also be given to critiques of classification schemes and diagnosis. Finally, implications for the treatment of specific disorders will be addressed. (Prerequisite: PSYC-1150 and PSYC-1160.)

PSYC-2360. Introduction to Social Psychology. Tuesday/Thursday from 8:30 AM - 11:20 AM in Toldo 200
An introduction to the theories, methods, findings, and problems associated with the study of the individual in the social context. Topics include social cognition; interpersonal behaviour (attraction, aggression, altruism); social attitudes, prejudice, and discrimination; social influence and group processes (conformity, leadership, intergroup relations).(Prerequisites: PSYC-1150 and PSYC-1160.)

SOSC-2500. Basic Quantitative Methods. Asynchronous Online
Introduction to measurement of variables, organization and description of numerical data, testing hypotheses, inference, and interpretation of findings in the Social Sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, normal distribution, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, t-tests, correlation, and chi-square tests. (Antirequisite: STAT-2910, STAT-2920, STAT-2950, MSCI-2020, GENG-2220, and KINE-2690.)


SOCIOLOGY & CRIMINOLOGY


SACR-2620. Introduction to Criminal Justice. Tuesday/Thursday from 6:30 PM - 9:20 PM in Erie Hall 2123
This course will examine the creation and administration of law and justice. Topics may include: legal systems, legal and justice professionals, civil and criminal law, courts and sanctions. Focus of the course will vary by instructor. (Prerequisites: SACR-1000 or SACR-1100)

FAHSS


GART-1510. Effective Writing II. Tuesday from 10:00 AM - 11:50 AM. 
A continuation of GART-1500 aimed at developing and refining writing skills for communicating ideas in academic and other contexts. Topics may include grammar, essay writing conventions, research skills, scholarly citations, editing and revising, academic learning, and critical thinking. This is a hybrid course. (Prerequisite: GART-1500.)

GART/SOSC-1210. Introduction to Indigenous Topics. Synchronous Online. 
This course introduces students to Indigenous histories, perspectives, and modern realities through an Indigenous lens. The role of colonization is introduced as Indigenous relationships on Turtle Island changed as a result of contact and colonization. This survey course provides a learning opportunity for students to engage in Indigenous pedagogy and worldview as they learn how history impacts the contemporary lives of Indigenous people. Through exploring relationships, this course engages critical reading, writing and thinking skills through course lectures and seminar activities. The history of relations assists in understanding how colonization’s policies and statutory documents thereafter affected Indigenous peoples, such as the Royal Proclamation, Treaties, the Indian Act, the British North America Act (1867), and the Constitution Act (1982). Today, these colonial-state governance documents are a significant part of Indigenous-Crown and Indigenous-settler relations. (2 lecture hours and 1 tutorial hour per week.) (Also offered as SOSC-1210.)

HISTORY


HIST-2510. History of Women's Movement in North America. Tuesday/Thursday from 10:00 AM - 12:50 PM in Dillon Hall 361
An exploration of the collective action of women in the past and present in North America. Areas of study may include women's involvement with the temperance, civil rights, suffrage, trade union, environmental, reproductive rights, and women's liberation movements. (Also offered as Women's and Gender Studies WGST-2510.) (3 lecture hours or 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour a week.)


LABOUR STUDIES


WORK-2600. Women and Globalization. Monday/Wednesday from 10:00 AM - 12:50 PM in Chrysler Hall North G125
This course introduces students to gender-sensitive analysis of the role of women in the global economy. Course materials cover the place of women in the international division of labour, the role of women in export-oriented industries in the "Third World," and women as "homeworkers" in the First and Third World. Students will utilize relevant empirical material to develop critical thinking and an understanding of gender inequalities in the "development process." (Prerequisites: at least Semester 3 standing.)(Also offered as Women's and Gender Studies WGST-2600.) 


PHILOSOPHY


PHIL-2210. Introduction to Ethics. 
A survey of the main contending theoretical positions on such basic questions of ethics as: Are all moral values and norms subjective or objective, relative or absolute? What makes right actions right? What is the good life for human beings?

PHIL-2250. Ethics of Life, Death and Health Care 
The course will focus on the ethical issues arising from human mortality and vulnerability to sickness. Problems to be explored will vary from year to year and may include: the relation between mortality and the value of life, the ethics of life-extension, the legitimacy of suicide, physician assisted or not, the ethics of human reproduction, allocating scarce medical resources in an ageing population, and the ethics of genetic engineering.

PSYCHOLOGY


PSYC-1160. Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science. Tuesday/Thursday from 1:00 PM - 3:50 PM in Toldo 100 
Introduction to selected areas in psychology including developmental, social, personality, and clinical.

PSYC-2240. Developmental Psychology: Adolescence. Monday/Wednesday from 11:30 AM - 2:20 PM in Toldo 104 
The study of normal adolescent development from puberty to early adulthood. Topics include physical changes at puberty, cognitive and social development, and the impact of adolescent development within various contexts, including families, peer groups, and schools.

PSYC-3330. Introduction to Clinicial Psychology. Monday/Wednesday from 4:00 PM - 6:50 PM in Toldo 202
This course surveys topics and issues in the field of clinical psychology, including biopsychosocial theories of functioning and dysfunction. Emphasis is placed on major approaches to assessment and treatment (e.g.humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic). The course also will cover the scientific basis for clinical psychology, as well as historical, ethical, professional, cultural and legal issues. Sub-specialties and contemporary issues are also addressed. (Prerequisite: PSYC-2280 or PSYC-3220)

SOCIOLOGY & CRIMINOLOGY


SACR-2910. Theorizing Social Life. Tuesday/Thursdsay from 6:30 PM - 9:20 PM in Chrysler Hall North G133
This course introduces students to theoretical work by focusing on classical social theorists such as Marx, Weber, and Durkheim and showing how classical approaches inform contemporary social analysis. Students learn how to interpret and persuasively appropriate theory, think conceptually, reflect on the basic assumptions of social analysis, and assess explanations. Topics covered typically include approaches to social order and change, modernity, ways of conceptualizing society and social life, methodology, institutional dynamics, class, inequality, and culture (Prerequisites: SACR-1100 (strongly recommended) or SACR-1000; students must be in Semester 3 of their program to register for this course).


SOCIAL WORK


WGST-2510. History of Women's Movements in North America. Tuesday/Thursday from 10:00 AM - 12:50 PM in Dillon Hall 361
An exploration of the collective action of women in the past and present in North America. Areas of study may include women's involvement with the temperance, civil rights, suffrage, trade union, environmental, reproductive rights, and women's liberation movements. (Also offered as History HIST-2510.) (3 lecture hours or 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour a week.)

WGST-2600. Women and Globalization. Monday/Wednesday from 10:00 AM - 12:50 PM in Chrysler Hall North G125
This course introduces students to gender-sensitive analysis of the role of women in the global economy. Course materials cover the place of women in the international division of labour, the role of women in export-oriented industries in the "Third World," and women as "homeworkers" in the First and Third World. Students will utilize relevant empirical material to develop critical thinking and an understanding of gender inequalities in the "development process." (Prerequisites: at least Semester 3 standing.)(Also offered as Work and Employment Issues WORK-2600.) 

CREATIVE ARTS


MACS-2450. Modern Art. Asynchronous Online
This course introduces students to the development of modern art from the eighteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century. The course covers the relationship between the artistic movements during this period and the cultural and political ideas that inform them. This course traces the rise of abstraction in the early part of the twentieth century as well as subsequent developments to the 1960s. In addition to studying major movements, students develop critical language around modern art practices through the application of thematic concepts such as the sublime, the everyday and the body. MACS 2140 and MACS-2150 for majors; or semester four standing for non-majors)
 

ENGLISH


ENGL-1001. Composition.
An introduction to the fundamentals of effective writing, including attention to rhetorical concepts of audience, purpose, context, planning, logical development, organization, format, and style. (Arts elective only; does not count for credit in English.)


POLITICAL SCIENCE


POLS-2110. Women and Politics. Monday/Wednesday from 10:00 AM - 11:20 AM 
An introduction to the principal themes in the study of women in Canadian politics. Topics may include: feminist theory, women in Canadian political institutions, the status of women in the Canadian economy, and gender equality rights in the Charter. (Also offered as Women's and Gender Studies WGST-2110).

POLS-2130. Public Opinion, Mass Media, and Canadian Democracy. Synchronous Online from 7:00 PM - 9:50 PM
An evaluation of the relationship between public opinion and democratic politics, how opinions, beliefs and attitudes are shaped by the family, educational system, peer groups, and in particular, mass media. Particular attention will be devoted to the role of the mass media in influencing public opinion and public policy.

POLS-2320. Government and Politics of the United States. Synchronous Online from 4:00 PM - 5:20 PM 
The organization and structure of national government in the United States, with emphasis upon congressional/executive relationships, political parties, and the electoral process.

SOCIAL WORK


WGST-1200. Gal Pals: Women and Friendship. 
This course examines a diverse range of women’s friendships. Through discussion, reading, and films we will explore topics such as the meaning of friendship for women, how women’s friendships have been portrayed in literature and film, the link between friendship and social activism for women, and the political meanings of women’s friendship in cultures resistant to woman-centered consciousness. (Can be taken for Social Science or Arts credit.)

The following courses are identified as courses with Indigenous content. However, before registering please consult with the department/instructor to learn more about the specifics of each course and its content.


FAHSS


GART/SOSC-1210. Introduction to Indigenous Topics. Synchronous Online (SUMMER 6 WEEKS) 
This course introduces students to Indigenous histories, perspectives, and modern realities through an Indigenous lens. The role of colonization is introduced as Indigenous relationships on Turtle Island changed as a result of contact and colonization. This survey course provides a learning opportunity for students to engage in Indigenous pedagogy and worldview as they learn how history impacts the contemporary lives of Indigenous people. Through exploring relationships, this course engages critical reading, writing and thinking skills through course lectures and seminar activities. The history of relations assists in understanding how colonization’s policies and statutory documents thereafter affected Indigenous peoples, such as the Royal Proclamation, Treaties, the Indian Act, the British North America Act (1867), and the Constitution Act (1982). Today, these colonial-state governance documents are a significant part of Indigenous-Crown and Indigenous-settler relations. (2 lecture hours and 1 tutorial hour per week.) (Also offered as SOSC-1210.)


PHILOSOPHY


PHIL-1290. Contemporary Moral Issues. (INTERSESSION 6 WEEKS)
A critical examination of philosophical arguments about controversial moral issues. Readings will be chosen by the instructor on issues connected with one or several areas such as: biomedical ethics, euthanasia, suicide, environmental ethics, the treatment of animals, war and violence, pornography, censorship. Some non-Western Philosophical sources may be used.


PSYCHOLOGY


PSYC-2240. Developmental Psychology: Adolescence. Monday/Wednesday from 11:30 AM - 2:20 PM in Toldo 104 (SUMMER 6 WEEKS)
The study of normal adolescent development from puberty to early adulthood. Topics include physical changes at puberty, cognitive and social development, and the impact of adolescent development within various contexts, including families, peer groups, and schools.


PSYC-3330. Introduction to Clinicial Psychology. Monday/Wedneday from 4:00 PM - 6:50 PM in Toldo 202 (SUMMER 6 WEEKS)
This course surveys topics and issues in the field of clinical psychology, including biopsychosocial theories of functioning and dysfunction. Emphasis is placed on major approaches to assessment and treatment (e.g.humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic). The course also will cover the scientific basis for clinical psychology, as well as historical, ethical, professional, cultural and legal issues. Sub-specialties and contemporary issues are also addressed. (Prerequisite: PSYC-2280 or PSYC-3220)

 

 

LINKS TO INDIGENOUS GROUPS AND SERVICES ON CAMPUS


Meet the FAHSS's Indigenous Scholars

Indigenous Studies in FAHSS (website version) | Indigenous Studies in FAHSS (downloadable program checklist) 

Turtle Island: Aboriginal Education Centre