Science

UWindsor biologist Barbara Zielinski and team. From left to right: Front row: Gillian Hughes, Dr. Barbara Zielinski, Jenna Jones, Kaela Scott, Dr. Michelle Nevett.  Back row: Tina Suntres, Georgette Nader, Gianfranco Grande, Alexandra Zygowska, Karl BoyesUWindsor biologist Barbara Zielinski and team. From left to right: Front row: Gillian Hughes, Dr. Barbara Zielinski, Jenna Jones, Kaela Scott, Dr. Michelle Nevett. Back row: Tina Suntres, Georgette Nader, Gianfranco Grande, Alexandra Zygowska, Karl Boyes.

Working to eradicate invasive species

A UWindsor biologist and students use pheromone research to outsmart the invasive sea lampre, an eel-like fish in the Great Lakes.

Cody Dey, a UWindsor post-doctoral researcher, says about 10 per cent of Arctic species have never been the subject of a published study.Cody Dey, a UWindsor post-doctoral researcher, says about 10 per cent of Arctic species have never been the subject of a published study.

UWindsor researcher finds Arctic species critically understudied

The focused scope of research in Canada’s Arctic potentially leaves dozens of species at risk, says a UWindsor post-doctoral researcher.

Cody Dey, currently studying in the Process-Driven Predictive Ecology Lab at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, said conserving Arctic wildlife poses a challenge because 10 per cent of birds, fish and mammal species have never been the subject of a published study.

Grade 11 students participating in the University of Windsor's Science Academy examine a jar containing the invasive spiny water fleas during a tour of the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research on Wednesday, July 11, 2018.Grade 11 students participating in the University of Windsor's Science Academy examine a jar containing the invasive spiny water fleas during a tour of the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research on Wednesday, July 11, 2018.

Past participants now mentors at UWindsor's Science Academy

Carefully tucked away in Layale Bazzi’s academic portfolio sits a certificate she received in Grade 11.

This certificate, while not her most notable accomplishment, represents a moment that forever influenced her academic career.

“When I first saw the University of Windsor’s department of physics in all its glory and met some of the students in the physics club at the time, it was like a whole new world opened up to me,” Bazzi said on Tuesday.