Science

Working to eradicate invasive species

UWindsor biologist Barbara Zielinski and team. From left to right: Front row: Gillian Hughes, Dr. Barbara Zielinski, Jenna Jones, Kaela Scott, Dr. Michelle Nevett.  Back row: Tina Suntres, Georgette Nader, Gianfranco Grande, Alexandra Zygowska, Karl BoyesUWindsor biologist Barbara Zielinski and team. From left to right: Front row: Gillian Hughes, Dr. Barbara Zielinski, Jenna Jones, Kaela Scott, Dr. Michelle Nevett. Back row: Tina Suntres, Georgette Nader, Gianfranco Grande, Alexandra Zygowska, Karl Boyes.

A UWindsor biologist and students use pheromone research to outsmart the invasive sea lampre, an eel-like fish in the Great Lakes.

Ceremony marks milestone in science building construction

Dean of science Chris Houser leads a line of University faculty, students, and officialsDean of science Chris Houser (left) leads a line of University faculty, students, and officials to autograph the final steel beam before it was added to the top of the science research and innovation building under construction west of Essex Hall.

A “topping off” ceremony Wednesday marked a key milestone in the construction of the new science research and innovation building.

Biochemist to study how proteins contribute to neurodegenerative diseases

UWindsor biochemistry graduate student Cody Caba and professor Bulent Mutus display the crystal structure of protein disulfide isomerase. Mutus received an NSERC Discovery Grant to examine cell proteins and structures and how they contribute to diseases.UWindsor biochemistry graduate student Cody Caba and professor Bulent Mutus display the crystal structure of protein disulfide isomerase. Mutus received an NSERC Discovery Grant to examine cell proteins and structures and how they contribute to diseases.

Bulent Mutus is a micro mechanic.

But instead of fixing cars with wrenches and grease, the biochemist rolls up his sleeves and chops up and rebuilds proteins using microscopes and Petri dishes.

“If this enzyme were a car we would know where the engine is, but now we are looking at turning that engine off so the pathology will go away,” the UWindsor professor said.