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Physics

Researchers collaborate with industry on innovations to benefit cognitive abilities for school-aged children and diagnostics for patients at risk of brain injury

UWindsor president Alan Wildeman will join Essex MP Jeff Watson and David Bogart, director of research programs and industry relations for the Ontario Brain Institute, for a media event Thursday showcasing two leading-edge research projects funded by the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario).

The projects have the potential to

High-end headphones exciting for draw winner

Carli Cristofari appreciates a good set of headphones.

“I am an only child, so I am constantly listening to music,” says the first-year medical physics major.

She had been considering buying a pair of Dr. Dre Beats Solo headphones just last month, but decided they were “way too expensive” a luxury for her. So she was doubly excited to win a set in a draw sponsored by the student alcohol education campaign.

Reception fêtes accomplishments of science faculty, staff and students

As a relative newcomer to campus, Steven Rehse—who joined the physics department in May 2011—says the Science Celebration of Success serves several purposes for him.

“First, it’s great to see what people in other departments are doing. Second, there is a social element and I am still getting to know people,” he said. “Finally, it’s great just to keep reminding ourselves of the extraordinary things going on in our faculty.”

Laser hair removal subject of physicist’s television appearance

A University of Windsor scientist will appear on Discovery Canada’s Daily Planet Thursday to explain the physics behind using lasers to remove tattoos and unwanted hair.

Physics professor Steven Rehse will be on the show using balloons and lasers to demonstrate the principles of a process called selective photothermolysis.

Seminar to explore discovery of newest subatomic particle

Scientists are hailing the discovery this summer of a new boson as the most significant advance in particle physics in 30 years.

Robert Harr, a professor of physics at Wayne State University and a member of the Collider Detector at Fermilab experiment, will discuss the implications in a free public seminar entitled “Sighting the Higgs boson: a field guide,” Thursday, September 13, at 2:30 p.m. in room 108, Odette Building.

Students use technology to help authenticate priceless art works

Editor's note: this is one of a series of articles about students who were involved in cool research, scholarly or creative activity this summer.

One of the most troubling dilemmas for collectors of fine art comes in discerning between genuine paintings and forgeries, but modern science is taking some of the guesswork out of the process. A pair of students recently spent two weeks at Cambridge University in England using state-of-the-art diagnostic imaging techniques to analyze rare pieces by some of the world’s best-known painters.

Physicist honoured with Queen’s Jubilee medal

Recognition earned by William McConkey is a source of pride for the Department of Physics, the Faculty of Science, and the University of Windsor, says dean of science Marlys Koschinsky.

Dr. McConkey, University Professor emeritus in physics, received the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal on Monday, June 18, at Toronto’s Roy Thomson Hall in the presence of the Governor General of Canada and the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario.

“This is wonderful news,” Dr. Koschinsky said. “Bill’s accomplishments are truly a great sources of pride for us.”