DailyNews Issue for Wednesday, Sep 2nd, 2015

94% of Ontario university grads have secured jobs two years after graduation: government survey

The average salary for graduates working full-time two years after graduation was $49,001 and just six months after graduation it was $42,301. The average salary for graduates working full-time two years after graduation was $49,001 and just six months after graduation it was $42,301.

The vast majority of Ontario university undergraduates secure jobs just two years after graduation. Those working full-time say their jobs are in their field, use the skills learned at university, and pay an average of more than $49,000, according to the latest Grad Survey.

The survey of graduates of Ontario undergraduate programs conducted for Ontario’s Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities shows that almost 94 per cent of graduates had jobs two years after graduation, and almost 88 per cent were in jobs six months after graduation.

The average salary for graduates working full-time two years after graduation was $49,001 and just six months after graduation it was $42,301.

Two years after leaving university, more than 89 per cent of graduates employed full-time considered their work related to the skills developed at university, and almost 78 per cent said their work was related to their program of study.

“A university education is worth the investment; university graduates can count on getting well-paying jobs in their fields soon after leaving university,” says Patrick Deane, Chair of the Council of Ontario Universities (COU) - which released the survey today - and President of McMaster University.

Bonnie M. Patterson, COU President and CEO, says empirical data shows university grads have the highest employment rates and highest earnings of graduates of any other level of education.

“The unmatched employment outcomes for university graduates demonstrate that universities are equipping students with the skills employers value,” Patterson says.

“Skills learned at university can be transferred within the knowledge economy as the job market changes and demands that people take on the jobs of the future.”

In all, 76,625 students who graduated from undergraduate programs at Ontario universities in 2012 were surveyed between November 2014 and March 2015 with 28,448 responding.

Read the survey.

View the infographic.

The Office of the Vice-President, Research and Innovation wishes to remind the university community to send in comments regarding the Draft Intellectual Property Policy.

The intent of the Intellectual Property Policy is to create a university environment that encourages the generation of new knowledge or creative activities by an individual or team of faculty, staff, and students and to facilitate wide transfer oThe intent of the Intellectual Property Policy is to create a university environment that encourages the generation of new knowledge or creative activities by an individual or team of faculty, staff, and students and to facilitate wide transfer of intellectual property and/or results of creative activities.

Over the past months, the Office of the Vice-President, Research and Innovation (VPRI), in consultation with faculty focus groups, has undertaken drafting of a University of Windsor Intellectual Property Policy.

The Draft Intellectual Property Policy outlines the University of Windsor's position on the general policies and guidelines that define the rights and obligations of University of Windsor faculty, staff, and students with regard to inventions and other intellectual property that result from their University activities.

The intent of this policy is to create a university environment that encourages the generation of new knowledge or creative activities by an individual or team of faculty, staff, and students and to facilitate wide transfer of intellectual property and/or results of creative activities.

Once in effect, this policy will apply to all members of the University of Windsor. It is intended to be read in conjunction with the obligations of the University in existing collective agreements, and to provide guidance in those cases where there is an absence of any expressed agreement concerning intellectual property rights. In cases where this policy conflicts with existing written agreements, including the Windsor University Faculty Association Collective Agreement, the existing written agreement will take precedence.

The Draft Intellectual Property Policy was emailed to all faculty on June 15 and is also available online at http://www1.uwindsor.ca/vpri/draft-intellectual-property-policy-review.

Please forward all comments to vpri@uwindsor.ca no later than September 18, 2015.