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Guillaume Teasdale

Ground-penetrating radar screenGround-penetrating radar used to locate graves and buried buildings is one of the instruments featured at Thursday’s event.

Public event to dig into local history

The next event in the Science on Tap series offers the public a chance to hear from professors participating in the WEDigHistory project.

Assumption ChurchUWindsor history professor Guillaume Teasdale will discuss historic Assumption parish Tuesday in a free public lecture marking its 250th anniversary.

Anniversary celebration to re-open doors of Assumption Church

UWindsor history professor Guillaume Teasdale will discuss historic Assumption parish Tuesday in a free public lecture marking its 250th anniversary.

 The Center for French Colonial Studies annual meeting will take place on campus and will focus on the French people in the Detroit River region in the 18th centuryThe Center for French Colonial Studies annual meeting will take place on campus and will focus on the French people in the Detroit River region in the 18th century

UWindsor to host Center for French Colonial Studies annual meeting

Online registration is now open for the 2015 meeting of the Center for French Colonial Studies, organized and hosted by UWindsor, October 23 to 25.

According to Guillaume Teasdale, assistant professor in the History department and a member of the organization’s international advisory board of directors, this is the first time in many years that the American-based historical organization’s annual meeting will be held in Canada. 

Lecture to explore early European use of Belle Isle

During the New France era, French settlers in the Detroit River region used Belle Isle for pastures, much as their Quebecois ancestors used islands in the St. Lawrence River.

In both regions, these pastures were used collectively and called “commons,” says historian Guillaume Teasdale. As he explains in his free public lecture on Wednesday, their fates diverged after the conquest by the British.