Chemistry & Biochemistry

Pam and DanBiochemistry PhD student Pam Ovadje and third-year undergrad Daniel Tarade recently presented their research at the Natural Health Products Research Society annual conference in British Columbia and came home with top honours in the oral and poster presentation competitions.

Cancer cell 'suicide' aim of award-winning students

Assisted suicide is topic guaranteed to court all kinds of controversy.

However one place where you’ll get general consensus on the matter is among the students working in the biochemistry lab of Siyaram Pandey, where rather than people, they help cancer cells commit suicide.

“One of the hallmarks of cancer cells is that they forget how to die,” says third-year undergrad Daniel Tarade. “We’re forcing their hand, and causing them to commit suicide.”

photo by Edwin TamGuard Andrea Kiss of the Lancer women’s basketball team, a biochemistry major. photo by Edwin Tam

Getting to know Andrea Kiss

Get to know members of the Lancer women’s basketball team; today’s player: Andrea Kiss.

student ambassadorsFrom left are Research Matters student ambassadors Maria van Duirhoven, Rami Gherib and Kelly Carr.

Student ambassadors fly flag for research

They’re trying to figure out how enzymes work in our bodies, better ways for people to select careers based on their personality and how physical activity can improve the lives of those with disabilities – and now they’re flying the flag for research at the University of Windsor.

INCHES programFrom left, PhD student Zainab Bazzi and chemistry professor Rob Schurko watch as Assumption student Chau Nguyen removes a flower from a cooler of liquid nitrogen.

High school students conduct their own chemistry magic show

It’s one thing to watch a magic show, but quite another to perform the tricks.

A group of Grade 11 chemistry students found that out yesterday when they visited the University to see first-hand what it will be like if they decide to pursue the subject at the next level.

Otis VacratsisOtis Vacratsis is one of several scientists to receive a Golden Jubilee Research award. He'll use it to help better understand the basic science behind the causes of Chacot-Marie-Tooth disease.

Outstanding scientists receive research and infrastructure grants

A better understanding of the basic causes of genetic diseases will be just one of the many outcomes of new research grants in the Faculty of Science.

Michael Miller and Tricia CarmichaelPhD student Michael Miller, left, and chemistry professor Tricia Carmichael examine a piece of silicone rubber with silver nanowires embedded in it. Their method of making the prototype marks an important step towards making stretchable electronics a reality.

Chemists develop innovative method for making bendable electronics

A chemist and her team of researchers have made a major stride forward in the race to make electronics that can bend and stretch.