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Mechanical, Automotive & Materials Engineering

Bill AltenhofEngineering professor Bill Altenhof holds up a piece of aluminum tubular frame that's been split by an axial cutting device.

Engineer designs device to dampen load from collision impact

Whether you’re driving a tank through a war zone or a minivan to the grocery store, you want the assurance of knowing your vehicle was designed to withstand any kind of collision, no matter how severe.

Kassem Bazzi, Matthew Vong, Tyler DoyleFrom left, students Kassem Bazzi, Matthew Vong and Tyler Doyle prepare to launch their trebuchet on Friday.

Trebuchet project puts student skills to the test

Engineering students were busy launching rubber balls through the industrial courtyard at the Ed Lumley Centre for Engineering Innovation on Friday.

The students were taking part in an assignment for their course in dynamics, which required them to construct a trebuchet – similar to a catapult that uses counterweights to launch its projectile – out of nothing more than wood, string and pop cans.

Engineers help local start-up launch new auto suspension parts production

A brand new local company will soon launch production of an important new automotive suspension component made of composite materials, and say they couldn’t have done it in twice the time without help from the University of Windsor.

“It’s really accelerated our ability to get to market faster,” said Andrew Glover, president of Thunder Composite Technologies Ltd., which will soon begin manufacturing composite sway bars at their new facility on the South Service Drive. “We’d be months behind if we hadn’t done this.”

Vanier scholarship a recognition for grad student's work

Meet Mehrdad Shademan for the first time and it’s easy to get the impression he’s a fairly quiet, low-key type of guy. He wasn’t so mild-mannered, however, the day he found out he was the recipient of a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship.

“I was screaming and yelling,” he says in the graduate student office he shares with colleagues in the Ed Lumley Centre for Engineering Innovation. “Everybody was pretty shocked.”