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Film professor Nick Hector has been garnering accolades for his work as editor and co-producer of the documentary “Prey.”Film professor Nick Hector has been garnering accolades for his work as editor and co-producer of the documentary “Prey.”

Film’s reception extends annus mirabilis for professor

The documentary Prey, a moving and unflinching account of a sexual abuse survivor's legal fight against the Catholic Church, is winning awards for the film’s editor and co-producer Nick Hector, who teaches film production at the University of Windsor’s School of Creative Arts.

Prof. Hector was recently nominated for the Directors Guild of Canada Award for Best Documentary Editing for Prey.

Prey is also among the nominees recently shortlisted for the Windsor International Film Festival’s (WIFF) first annual Prize in Canadian Film. The winner will be announced after the festival, which runs Nov. 1 to 10 in downtown Windsor.

Earlier this year, Prey won both the Jury Prize and the Audience Award for Best Canadian Film at the Hot Docs festival. The jury called it a film with extraordinary access and a masterful edit, which was deliberate and exacting.

“The filmmaker had us in their grip from the first moment, leaving us with a heightened understanding of the lasting damage on innocent lives that can never be atoned for,” read the Hot Docs jury’s statement.

Linda Fong, independent production officer for documentaries at TVOntario, called Prey “truly special.”

“The response from the Hot Docs audience was powerful and overwhelming,” she said. “Many were moved to tears when the survivors in the film stood up to a standing ovation. Their courage and grace were humbling, and it was a privilege for us to help bring this important story to audiences across the country.”

The film was directed by Windsor-based Matt Gallagher, produced by Cornelia Principe, co-produced by Gallagher and Hector, who also edited it.

—Susan McKee

Last year’s “Why Humanities?” competition winner, Rima Asfour (centre), accepts congratulations from UWindsor provost Douglas Kneale and Humanities Research Group director Kim Nelson.Last year’s “Why Humanities?” competition winner, Rima Asfour (centre), accepts congratulations from UWindsor provost Douglas Kneale and Humanities Research Group director Kim Nelson.

Contest seeks answers to question: Why Humanities?

The Humanities Research Group (HRG) is once again asking students one simple question: Why do the humanities matter?

Its annual contest offers a reward of a University of Windsor $5,000 tuition credit.

All students are eligible to compete by submitting a short essay, poem, video, or anything that can be read, heard, or seen in two minutes or less.

The deadline is Nov. 1. Entries must be submitted directly to HRGmail@uwindsor.ca with the email subject “Why Humanities Contest.” The winner will be chosen by the HRG Advisory Board and the prize will go to the most original and inspiring entry.

The winner will be announced Nov. 15 alongside the other finalists at the Green Bean Cafe at 5 p.m. to celebrate 30 years of the Humanities Research Group.

Visit the group’s website for more information.

—Dana Roe

Berenica Vejvoda is the Leddy Library’s new academic data librarian.Berenica Vejvoda is the Leddy Library’s new academic data librarian.

Academic data librarian looking forward to working with researchers

In the technological age of information, analytics, and statistics, almost everything we do can be converted into research data. For the Leddy Library’s new academic data librarian, Berenica Vejvoda, the data collected from our everyday actions has the potential to solve problems, assist decision making, create new knowledge, and tell compelling stories.

Vejvoda will help the campus community understand, use, and analyze data through the services provided by Leddy Library’s Academic Data Centre.

“We not only help researchers discover and work with data, but we also teach researchers how to use statistical software,” she says.

In addition to leading the Academic Data Centre, Vejvoda will support students and faculty through the entire research data life cycle, including helping researchers manage their original data for preservation.

She says that working with data provides a valuable and unique opportunity to meet with researchers during all phases of the research process.

“I get to meet with researchers from a variety of disciplines and research areas,” said Vejvoda. “What I enjoy the most is witnessing researchers build evidence-based data-supported narratives to explain social constructs or promote social change.”

For more information, contact Vejvoda at Berenica.Vejvoda@uwindsor.ca.

—Marcie Demmans

The Leadership Opportunities page lists hundreds of volunteer and paid positions for students.The Leadership Opportunities page lists hundreds of volunteer and paid positions for students.

Web page lists opportunities for student leadership

Leaders aren’t born, says Simon du Toit — they’re made.

Program co-ordinator for leadership development in the student success centre, he has put together a webpage highlighting campus opportunities for students to exercise their leadership muscles.

“Leadership skills progress through development — you participate in conferences, team-building exercises, and shared experiences,” du Toit says. “Getting involved builds capacity for further personal growth.”

His page already lists hundreds of positions, both paid and volunteer, representing collaboration with the University Senate, the University of Windsor Students’ Alliance, and other campus offices.

But, du Toit notes, it’s a work in progress.

“I want to invite anyone who is offering a student leadership position to let me know the details and send a web link so we can list their opportunity, bringing it to the attention of students who may lend their talents to the cause,” he says.

Program managers may forward details to leadership@uwindsor.ca to have their links posted to the Leadership Opportunities page.

Law and politics student Katrina Bahnam looks forward to her lunch of vegetable pot stickers and lo mein from the Wok N Roll outlet in the Marketplace food court.Law and politics student Katrina Bahnam looks forward to her lunch of vegetable pot stickers and lo mein from the Wok N Roll outlet in the Marketplace food court.

New food outlet brings taste of China to campus

The newest concept in the Marketplace food court provides a fresh choice for diners, says Mark Bagley, manager of satellite operations for Food Services.

Wok N Roll serves familiar Chinese dishes, from sweet and sour chicken and Shanghai noodles to beef stir-fry and fried rice, along with vegetarian egg rolls, spring rolls, and pot sticker dumplings.

“We think that students will appreciate having this to add to the mix,” Bagley says. “And with meal combos priced as low as $7.59, it’s a very competitive option for lunch or dinner.”

He notes that flavours like ginger and soy sauce will feel like home to some international students, while still being well-known to locals.

“What’s more Canadian than a Chinese restaurant?” says Bagley. “This cuisine is a staple in just about every town, coast to coast.”

Wok N Roll is located in the CAW Student Centre, and operates 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday; and Fridays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Campus mourns death of retiree Maxine Holder-Franklin

Campus flags will be lowered Wednesday, Oct. 9, in memory of UWindsor retiree Maxine Holder-Franklin, who died Oct. 2.

Dr. Holder-Franklin entered the University's employ on Jan. 1, 1992 as an Associate Professor with the Department of Biology. In 1994, she was promoted to Professor — a position she held until her retirement on Sept. 1, 1997.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday, Oct. 9 at 1 p.m.

See Holder-Franklin's obituary online.