Coming to campus? Visit this page for important information.

Looking for an interesting course?

Here are some course ideas for Winter 2022 semester

New courses 

The instructor is Governor-General’s Award finalist Gord Gwisenthwaite,  a member of Lytton First Nation, on the specific topic of Magic Realism in Indigenous Literatures. ENGL 1005-1, Topics in Literature: Indigenous Literatures - Magic Realism in Indigenous Literatures

ENGL 1005-1, Topics in Literature: Indigenous Literatures is currently open, MW 10:00-11:20. Once we return to in-person classes, this course will be offered in-person in Erie Hall 1118. The instructor is Governor-General’s Award finalist Gord Gwisenthwaite,  a member of Lytton First Nation, on the specific topic of Magic Realism in Indigenous Literatures. All students are welcome to apply. A reminder that classes begin (online) on Monday, January 17th

 

PHIL 1350     Culture, Health, and Social Justice on Turtle Island

PHIL 1350   Culture, Health, and Social Justice on Turtle Island

Recent headlines attest to the fact that Indigenous people in Canada in general receive inadequate healthcare and are subject to neglect and abuse at the hands of those entrusted to provide that care. Some, like Joyce Echaquan and Brian Sinclair, sought medical treatment only to experience racism from caregivers and ultimately died in the hospital. This course explores the theory, research, and professional expectations regarding cultural competency, safety, and humility with respect to the nursing and healthcare of Indigenous people and communities. Throughout the course, we will consider how colonialism factors into the health disparities of contemporary Indigenous communities, employing philosophical skills, such as self-reflection and critical thinking, to promote social justice in the care of Indigenous people in Turtle Island.

When:   Mondays and Fridays 11:30 am – 12:50 pm  
  with Monday lectures recorded for asynchronous learning

 

BioART

VSAR 3860  BioART: Contemporary Art and the Life Sciences.  INCUBATOR Art Lab, School of Creative Arts, University of Windsor
WINTER 2022, Thursdays 11:30-2:20
Location: AB B36, Armouries Downtown, in person class with some online content.
This course is a visual art and science crossover lab intended for students from various disciplines to foster interdisciplinary exploration of the intersections between art and the life sciences through hands-on laboratory protocols, critical readings, theoretical writing, and the production of contemporary artwork. No previous experience in art or biological sciences is required.
 
We encourage students from outside the School of Creative Arts to join the class. Non SoCA students will require permission to enroll through contacting Dr Jennifer Willet jwillet@uwindsor.ca
For more information, please visit www.incubatorartlab.com

BioART PDF

 

Winter 2022:  01-27-3860 section 01 BioART: Contemporary Art and the Life Sciences

 

Drama in Education and Community

Intro to Drama in Education and Community II

History

 

Hist 2620: History of America, 1877 to the present

HIST 3620: African Americans/Canadians after Emancipation, 1877 to the present

HIST 4970: The US in Southeast Asia

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

GRST 2000: Topics in Classical Culture: Ancient Science, Tech., Engineering & Math

GRST 2000 - Ancient Science, Tech., Engineering, & Math

Introduction to Roman Civilization GRST 1200

 

Music

Film Music 3170

Music Ensembles - Jazz, Wind, and Choir

 

Psychology

 

Psychology 4360 - Seminar in Psychopathology

Working for a Living

WORK-1500-01    This course uses the students' own experiences of work to examine the economic, social, and psychological significance of paid and unpaid work in Canadian society, the tasks and values assigned to various kinds of work, and the relationship between work and living standards.

Offered in Winter 2022 online on Wednesdays at 11:30am-2:20pm

Working for a living

WGST-4000-01    Exploring the Feminist Voice    Mondays 11:30-2:00

WGST-4000-01    Exploring the Feminist Voice

This class provides students with an opportunity for online practical experience at a local community organization or within the university. In the first half of the class, a supportive learning community is created where students explore issues pertaining to ethical engagement with community organizations, and putting intersectional feminist perspectives into action. Topics may include: critical allyship and solidarity, transgender perspectives, challenging anti-Black racism, feminist praxis, and university-community engagement. In the second half of the class, students are placed with an organization for (online) hands-on experience. Prerequisites: WGST-3590 (or WGST-3050) and WGST-3060.    Mondays 11:30-2:20

 

 

 

Updated: January 7, 2022