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History

runaway slavesMany slaves escaped their situations in the US only to be re-enslaved in the Maritimes, according to a visiting lecturer who will speak here Thursday.

End to slavery brought new form of racism in eastern Canada

African-descended people played an important role in bringing slavery to an end in Canada’s Maritimes, but that came with some cost.

Carlin MillerCarlin Miller will be researching the effectiveness of a course designed to improve mindfulness for teachers and parents of children with ADHD.

ADHD study among projects backed by research stimulus fund

Anyone who ever raised and educated a child with ADHD knows it can be a challenge, but armed with new stimulus funding, a psychology professor is planning to equip parents and teachers with skills to better deal with their demands.

Cooking creates connections for historian

You might think cooking an exotic meal for his family or invited guests would be a welcome distraction from his labour, but it actually brings Rob Nelson closer to his work as an historical researcher.

“Food has so much to do with culture and history, so cooking a recipe from a country like Senegal, for instance, can really enhance your understanding of a place, even if you’ve never been there,” said Dr. Nelson. “You just feel like you have some kind of connection through cooking.”

Calin MurguThird-year history major Calin Murgu holds up a copy of the inaugural edition of The Great Lakes Journal of Undergraduate History.

New journal recognizes undergraduate history research

Calin Murgu figured it was about time all the great historical research being done by his undergraduate colleagues was given some more permanent recognition.

“A lot of it just gets written up in papers, handed in and read by professors, assigned a grade, and that’s it,” said Murgu, a fourth-year history major. “We just felt that there wasn’t enough attention placed on the works of undergraduates and that there are times when there is some really good research that’s happening.”

Sandy AntalRetired Canadian Forces Major and historical researcher Sandy Antal will deliver a free public lecture Thursday about the Patriot attacks on Southwestern Ontario in the late 1830s.

Patriot attacks in Essex-Kent subject of historical lecture

Despite a massive level of discontent that existed in Essex-Kent in the late 1830s, people here were still not dissatisfied enough to side with attacking “Patriots” from the United States who were trying to drive the British right out of North America, according to a visiting author who will lecture here on Thursday night.

Film screening an opportunity to air memories of Windsor war veterans

A question-and-answer session with veterans of the Canadian Forces will follow a free public screening of the documentary “The Veterans’ Memories Project,” Tuesday, April 9, at 4 p.m. in Vanier Hall’s Winclare A.

The film, produced by the Windsor Historical Society, showcases veterans and examines their involvement in conflicts from World War II to Afghanistan.

Discussion of Roman gladiators to open classics conference

A keynote address entitled “Investing in Death: Gladiators as Investment and Currency in the Late Republic” will open the eighth annual University of Windsor Undergraduate Classics Conference, Friday, March 1, at 4 p.m. in Alumni Hall’s McPherson Lounge.

The public is invited to the free lecture, by York University history professor Jonathan Edmondson.