2024 News Archive

Engineering students looking to float their boat in national competition

Shasank Natakam, Katie Sinn, and Valdemar Kochanowski by concrete canoe.Engineering students Shasank Natakam, Katie Sinn, and Valdemar Kochanowski pose with their entry in the 2024 concrete canoe competition.

Engineering students looking to float their boat in national competition

The UWindsor team in the Canadian National Concrete Canoe Competition has high hopes for its entry, in Quebec this week to be evaluated on academic, technical, and sports aspects.

“This year, we changed the design to a more traditional canoe shape and added some colour, and it looks a lot smoother,” says captain Katie Sinn, a third-year student of civil engineering. “It is lighter, and we decreased the weight by over 50 per cent from last year’s design.”

The competition, sponsored by the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering, challenges students from across the country to test their design prowess, shaping the dense material into a fully functional canoe ready to race in the water.

$15 million research project to boost Canada’s pandemic preparedness

Arezoo Emadi, Mike McKay, Kendall Soucie, and Kenneth NgProfessors Arezoo Emadi, Mike McKay, Kendall Soucie, and Kenneth Ng are pictured along the Windsor-Detroit riverfront, showcasing the interdisciplinary team leading the $15 million INSPIRE project to advance Canada’s biomanufacturing and pandemic response capabilities.

$15 million research project to boost Canada’s pandemic preparedness

The University of Windsor is leading a $15 million research project to help Canada respond to future pandemics by strengthening our country’s biomanufacturing sector.

INSPIRE, short for the Integrated Network for the Surveillance of Pathogens: Increasing Resilience and Capacity in Canada’s Pandemic Response, brings together 43 experts from seven universities and public and private agencies in Canada and the United States. This team of microbiologists, biochemists, engineers, computer scientists, and experts in supply chains and public policy will look for ways to improve biomanufacturing and health sector supply chains, bolster cross-border trade and mobility, and explore new technologies in pathogen surveillance.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, we had supply chain shortages, we couldn’t get enough PPE in Canada, we weren’t making our own vaccines,” said Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research director Mike McKay, who is leading INSPIRE together with a researcher from the University of Guelph.

Exhibit to connect Windsor Engineering with international industry

Narayan Kar and Matteo Pizzuto check the connectionsCHARGE lab director Narayan Kar and grad student Matteo Pizzuto check the connections between a vehicle in Windsor and operators at a conference in Germany.

Exhibit to connect Windsor Engineering with international industry

The University of Windsor is giving attendees at a conference in Germany a chance to try a remote-control car with a difference: it’s a full-size vehicle more than 6,500 km remote.

A team from Windsor Engineering has set up a connection between the Centre for Engineering Innovation and the Hannover Messe Expo, the world’s trade fair catering to companies from the mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and digital industries.

Engineering students address sustainable development goals on World Water Day

Tirupati Bolisetti and Kwaku Gyau GyamfiCivil engineering professor Tirupati Bolisetti and Kwaku Gyau Gyamfi discuss the student’s project on resilience of water supplies in Arctic communities on World Water Day.

Engineering students address sustainable development goals on World Water Day

The next time you look at the Great Lakes or wonder about Arctic communities, you will think about them a little differently because of the research of engineering students Vrashesh Vipul Karkar and Kwaku Gyau Gyamfi.

Karkar examined the water in Great Lakes Basin watersheds to assess the amount of microplastics that are present in the water. His research focuses on the quantities of microplastics humans are releasing into rivers and the Great Lakes, developing cutting edge modelling tools to quantify the microplastics being released.

Team applying old tires as solution to earthquake threat

Niel Van EngelenCan we repurpose old tires as a buffer to protect buildings from earthquake damage? Professor Niel Van Engelen is leading a project to find out.

Team applying old tires as solution to earthquake threat

What if a material that could protect structures from earthquake damage was widely available all over the world? Niel Van Engelen is exploring the use of scrap tires as a type of shock absorber between buildings and their foundations.

A professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Dr. Van Engelen is an expert in structural control and earthquake engineering. The project team includes doctoral student Norouz Jahan and master’s student Tanveer Shaik.

Design competition gets engineering careers on track

professors standing near obstacle courseProfessor Rashid Rashidzadeh and dean Bill Van Heyst congratulate engineering students on their work programming model trains to navigate an obstacle course.

Design competition gets engineering careers on track

A competition challenging first-year engineering students to design and program an autonomous model locomotive gave them the chance to apply theoretical knowledge to real-world applications, says professor Rashid Rashidzadeh.

His course in Cornerstone Design is mandatory for first-year students and culminated in more than 70 teams competing for cash prizes April 1 and 2.

The class is highly praised by students for its hands-on approach, says Dr. Rashidzadeh.

“Students thoroughly enjoy the practical aspect of the course, allowing them to put their academic understanding into action.”

Tensions ran high as teams tested their design and programming skills by putting their railcars through a course with such obstacles as a functional drawbridge and customs communication booth.

Cultural comparison of distracted drivers subject of study

Cultural comparison of distracted drivers subject of study

Distracted driving is a worldwide problem, says professor Chris Lee, and preventing it is of global importance for improved road safety.

“There has been a startling rise in the number of fatal and seriously injured collisions linked to the widespread use of electronic gadgets in automobiles,” he says.

Dr. Lee, a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Master’s student Larissa Dushime are collaborating with civil engineering professor Nicola Baldo at the University of Udine to compare driver behaviours in Canada and Italy.

Prof assessing impacts of climate change on water resources

Dr. Bolisetti judging student posterEngineering professor Tirupati Bolisetti integrates socio-economic factors into strategies to adapt water management to climate change.

Prof assessing impacts of climate change on water resources

If we want to mitigate the effects of climate change on waterways, we’ll need to change our own ways, says Tirupati Bolisetti.

A professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, he integrates socio-economic factors into water management models and adaptation strategies from the Great Lakes to the Arctic. Challenges addressed in his research range from urban flooding to quality and quantity of drinking water supply.

 

Team addressing challenge of powering greenhouse sector

Rupp CarriveauEngineering professor Rupp Carriveau and his research collaborators are exploring the use of wind to power agricultural greenhouses.

Team addressing challenge of powering greenhouse sector

It takes a lot of juice to run a greenhouse, and a UWindsor researcher is leading a project exploring how to provide it.

Rupp Carriveau, a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and a team that includes partners from the agricultural and energy industries, have secured funds to investigate the use of hydrogen generated by wind power to supply power to both the electrical grid and the greenhouse sector.