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Kate Hargreaves

Reading to launch anthology of local poets

A UWindsor professor is one of the editors of a book celebrating the talents of poets from the Windsor-Essex region.

Creative writing professor Susan Holbrook and Palimpsest Press publisher Dawn Kresan edited Detours: an anthology of poets from Windsor & Essex County, a showcase of the eclecticism that characterizes the region: the traditional and experimental, the academy and community, the established and emergent, the internationally renowned and promising apprentice.

Alumnae authors to launch books Wednesday

Relationships are at the heart of two books being launched tonight by Black Moss Press.

Talking Derby, by Kate Hargreaves, explores a young woman’s love affair with her roller skates, and the poetry collection Whisky Sour City, edited by Vanessa Shields, brings together works by Windsor poets to reveal their tangled ties with the city.

Girls’ night out promises poetry reading

The Art Gallery of Windsor’s monthly art lounge will have a University flavour Thursday, as instructor Marty Gervais hosts and two of the three featured poets are UWindsor alumnae.

“Girls Night Out” will feature Kate Hargreaves (BA 2010, MA 2012), Vanessa Shields (BA 2002) and Melanie Janisse reading humorous works dealing with everything from roller derby to pregnancy.

Patrons will also have an opportunity to tour current exhibitions “Paris/Ojibwa” by Robert Houle, “The Wildcraft” by Kika Thorne, and “Mean Machines” by John Scott.

Gold medallist author of her own good fortune

In recommending Kate Hargreaves for the Governor General's Gold Medal, the department of English Language, Literature and Creative Writing described the two-time grad (BA 2010, MA 2012) as “the most talented and hard-working student we have had the pleasure to teach and mentor.”

Hargreaves received the medal as the top graduate student in her cohort at Saturday’s Convocation ceremonies.

Fast to benefit famine victims

Thirty hours without food cannot compare with the suffering of people in famine-stricken Somalia, says Candace Spencer, but it may help to relieve it.

The coordinator of the Womyn’s Centre is organizing the UWindsor 30-Hour Famine, part of a national effort to raise funds in relief of Somali refugees.

“I think everybody has seen what is happening in Somalia,” says the political science and women’s studies major. “We want to give them just a taste of how it is for these people day after day after day.”