Are you a Lancer Team Player?

Take the cybersecurity awareness challenge!

Computer Care - Skeletons

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Scenario (Skeletons):

You see an older computer running in the office or lab. It's powered on, but looks forgotten about, as if no one has touched it in months or even years.

Questions you might ask yourself before disregarding the computer:
  • What is that computer? What’s it doing? Should it even be there?
  • How long has it been since anyone checked on it?
  • Is it still secure and being supported?
  • Should I report it to IT Services?

Old computers can be a risk to the organization. They will eventually fail and if the data stored on the device has not been saved elsewhere, it could be lost forever. Computers also need to be maintained, serviced, and patched for security. An unpatched or abandoned computer is like an unlocked window, a welcome invitation to a hacker to climb in and start infiltrating the rest of the organization from inside. They should be reported to the department technician or IT Services.

Recommended Response

"Oops! I tripped on the power cable. How clumsy of me."

Be a Lancer Team Player

A Lancer Team Player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like a firewall.

Old computers can be a risk to the organization. They will eventually fail and if the data stored on the device has not been saved elsewhere, it could be lost forever. Computers also need to be maintained, serviced, and patched for security. An unpatched or abandoned computer is like an unlocked window, a welcome invitation to a hacker to climb in and start infiltrating the rest of the organization from inside. They should be reported to the department technician or IT Services.

Recommended Response

"Oops! I tripped on the power cable. How clumsy of me."

Be a Lancer team player

A Lancer team player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like firewalls.

Mobile Device Security - App installation

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Scenario (App installation):

You’re browsing the web on your mobile device and a pop-up appears to download the site’s mobile app.

Before you download the app, here are questions you might ask yourself:
  • Do I use this website often? Should I install an app I might never use again?
  • Is the app distributed through an app store?
  • What data will this app collect?
  • Do I trust this website? ?

Some apps provide an optimized experience for mobile devices and provide value. Use the AppStore & iTunes or Google Play for trusted apps, games and media. But other apps may be harmful or continually track your location, so use caution before installing. Don’t install apps that ask for permissions that don’t make sense for the app. Read an app's reviews before installing it. Delete apps that you’re not using.

Recommended Response

"I do not need another app, but thanks for the offer."

Be a Lancer Team Player

A Lancer Team Player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like firewalls.

Some apps provide an optimized experience for mobile devices and provide value. Use the AppStore & iTunes or Google Play for trusted apps, games and media. But other apps may be harmful or continually track your location, so use caution before installing. Don’t install apps that ask for permissions that don’t make sense for the app. Read an app's reviews before installing it. Delete apps that you’re not using.

Recommended Response

"I do not need another app, but thanks for the offer."

Be a Lancer Team Player

A Lancer team player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like a firewall.

Password Care - Information Exposure

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Scenario (Information Exposure):

You are tagged in a post on social media, asking you to respond to a series of fun questions about yourself, and to share it to your wall, tagging others, and the person who tagged you. 

Questions you might ask yourself before sharing the information:
  • Who is going to see this information?
  • How personal is it?
  • Have I used any of these answers in security questions to protect accounts?
  • Do I really want to publish this much information about me, what I’m interested in, and where I go? 

While fun and a way to connect with your friends on social media, these surveys reveal a lot of information about yourself. The details are often like what is used for security questions or identity verification. Publishing this data makes it easier for someone to impersonate you.

Recommended Response

Ignore the tag and do not respond.

Be a Lancer Team Player

A Lancer Team Player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like a firewall.

While fun and a way to connect with your friends on social media, these surveys reveal a lot of information about yourself. The details are often like what is used for security questions or identity verification. Publishing this data makes it easier for someone to impersonate you.

Recommended Response

Ignore the tag and do not respond.

Be a Lancer Team Player

A Lancer team player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like a firewall.

Recognizing Phishing - Unexpected Support

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Scenario (Unexpected Support):

You receive a call from your bank or credit card company to inform you about a fraudulent transaction detected from your computer. They’d like to do a remote computer session with you to solve the problem. 

Questions you might ask yourself before allowing access to your computer:
  • Is this how I told my bank to contact me for fraudulent transactions?
  • Can the caller provide specific details about the account and transaction in question?
  • Could they be after something else by gaining access to my computer?

This is an example of a phishing trend. Criminals are taking advantage of the banks that offer account alerts and use it to start a conversation and build initial rapport. They are trying to access to your computer so they can compromise it with spyware or ransomware. Contact your bank or credit card company directly yourself using your usual method.

Recommended Response

End the call, nobody has time to be hacked.

Be a Lancer Team Player

A Lancer team player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like a firewall.

This is an example of a phishing trend. Criminals are taking advantage of the banks that offer account alerts and use it to start a conversation and build initial rapport. They are trying to access to your computer so they can compromise it with spyware or ransomware. Contact your bank or credit card company directly yourself using your usual method.

Recommended Response

End the call, nobody has time to be hacked.

Be a Lancer Team Player

A Lancer team player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like a firewall.

Recognizing Phishing - Unusual Requests

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Scenario (Unusual Requests):  

A co-worker sends an email asking you to send them a staff list because the boss is away.

Questions you might ask yourself before sending the list: 

  • Why did they ask you? 
  • Why would your co-worker need you, couldn’t they look it up themselves? 
  • Is the co-worker from your department? 
  • Are you even authorized to send the list? 

An attacker could be impersonating your co-worker, trying to trick you into sending them information that they can use to target others in your department. Even if the request is legitimate, are you the person that should be sending the information? Perhaps you could direct them to the departmental administrator or human resources instead. 

Recommended Response

"Sorry, I don’t think I have an up-to-date list."

Be a Lancer Team Player

A Lancer team player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like a firewall.

An attacker could be impersonating your co-worker, trying to trick you into sending them information that they can use to target others in your department. Even if the request is legitimate, are you the person that should be sending the information? Perhaps you could direct them to the departmental administrator or human resources instead. 

Recommended Response

"Sorry, I don’t think I have an up-to-date list."

Be a "Human Firewall"

A human firewall is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A human firewall pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to be human firewalls.

Working from Home & Campus - Mystery Wifi

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Scenario (Mystery Wi-Fi):

You are outside of the office working on your laptop or phone. You notice that there is a Wi-Fi network available that you recognize.

Questions you might ask yourself before connecting to the Wi-Fi network: 

  • Do I expect to find this particular Wi-Fi network in this location? Why would it be here? 
  • Does the network say that it is secured? 
  • What does it mean if the network is unsecured? 
  • Do I have a Virtual Private Network installed to protect myself?

Hackers can setup a lookalike network to lure you into connecting so that they can intercept all your communication. Only connect to wireless networks that are secured and in a place you expect them to be. Use a VPN to prevent eavesdropping.

Recommended Response

Don’t connect.

Be a Lancer Team Player

A Lancer team player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like firewall.

Hackers can setup a lookalike network to lure you into connecting so that they can intercept all your communication. Only connect to wireless networks that are secured and in a place you expect them to be. Use a VPN to prevent eavesdropping.

Recommended Response

Don’t connect.

Be a Lancer Team Player

A Lancer team player is someone who thinks about the cybersecurity implications of a situation and takes appropriate action to safeguard accounts, information and research, and computing resources. It’s the digital equivalent of looking both ways before crossing the street. A Lancer team player pauses to stop, think, then clicks only if appropriate.

Many users have a false sense of security, believing that technology solutions such as passwords, anti-virus, and network firewalls protect them from the evils of the Internet. Technology cannot protect against everything, so online users also need to act like a firewall.