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Jillian Rogin


 

Biography

Jillian Rogin joined the Faculty of Law in July of 2017 as the Assistant (Clinic) Professor. Her research focuses on judicial interim release, evidentiary issues in sexual assault law, legal clinic scholarship including legal ethics, and feminist/critical race/post-colonial theory. She is currently the Clinic Professor and runs the clinic academic credit program at Community Legal Aid and Legal Assistance of Windsor

Professor Rogin holds an LLM (Osgoode Hall, York University), an MES (Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University), an LLB (University of Windsor), and a BA Hons (Indigenous Studies and Philosophy, Trent University). She is a member of the Law Society of Ontario (called in 2009) and is a practicing criminal defence lawyer. Prior to her appointment, she was a duty counsel lawyer (criminal law) and a research lawyer with Legal Aid Ontario, and worked as Review Counsel at Community Legal Aid. She clerked for the Superior Court of Justice (Toronto) in fulfillment of her articles. Professor Rogin sits on a number of boards and is heavily involved in her community.

Publications

Gladue and Bail: The Pre-trial Sentencing of Aboriginal People in Canada” (2017) 95-2 Canadian Bar Review 325

Sylvia McAdam (Saysewahum), Jillian Rogin, Reem Bahdi, “Law professor put on trial for ‘trespassing’ on family’s ancestral lands” (March 25, 2019, The Conversation)

Contributing and Contributed Author, (2009 – Present) Hill, Tanovich, Strezos, McWilliams Canadian Criminal Evidence The Honourable Mr. Justice S. Casey Hill, David M. Tanovich, Louis P. Strezos and Scott G.Hutchison, McWilliam’s Canadian Criminal Evidence (Canada Law Book: Canada, 2011), Chapter 16 “Prior Sexual History”, Chapter 17 “Third Party Records”(contributed), Chapter 35 “Bail Hearings”, “Year in Review”, 2012.

In Progress

Jillian Rogin, Gemma Smyth, Johanna Dennie, “ACCLE and Bill C-75: Implications for Student Legal Clinics & Communities in Canada” (under review, Journal of Law and Social Policy)