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Faculty & Staff

For general inquiries please contact the History department by phone, fax, or email:

Dr. Rob Nelson
Department Head
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2318
Fax: (519) 971-3610
history@uwindsor.ca


Staff Directory

Jennifer Rocheleau
Program Secretary
Chrysler Hall North 1184
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2318
jenroch@uwindsor.ca

Monika Burdzy
P.T. Secretary
Chrysler Hall North 1180
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2319
​mburdzy@uwindsor.ca


Faculty Directory

1175 Chrysler Hall North
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2321
burrc@uwindsor.ca


Associate Professor, History
Graduate Faculty

  • Ph.D. History, Memorial University
  • M.A. Physical Education, University of Western Ontario
  • B.A. Physical Education, University of Western Ontario

Research & Teaching Interests

History of the body, women and the media, Canadian history, labour history, women's history


Current Projects

I am working on a study of how the global marketing and advertising of women’s toiletries and cosmetics have shaped modern women’s beauty ideals, sometimes pointing to distinctive local situations, histories of nationalism, racial formations, global trade and the transnational flow of people and ideas.

My work focuses on a case study of Unilever, the multinational British and Dutch soap manufacturer, examining their business records, consumer market surveys and advertising campaigns.


Selected Publications

  • ''The Closest Thing to Perfect': Celebrity and the Body Politics of Jamie Lee Curtis" In Health and Popular Culture edited by Cheryl Krasnick Warsh. Ontario: Wilfred Laurier University Press, 2009. Forthcoming.
  • Canada's Victorian Oil Town: The Transformation of Petrolia from Resource Town into a Victorian Community. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2006.
  • Spreading the Light: Work and Labour Reform in Nineteenth Century Toronto. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1999.

Courses Taught

  • HIST 2500: Women in Canada and the United States, 1870-present
  • HIST 3020: History Workshop
  • HIST 3680: North American Popular Culture
  • HIST 8040: Research Methods
  • HIST 8090: Studies in Canadian Social History

1177 Chrysler Hall North
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000 ext. 2320
huffaker@uwindsor.ca


Associate Professor, History
Graduate Faculty

  • Ph.D. University of California Santa Barbara, 2008
  • M.A. School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, 1995
  • B.A. Boise State University, 1994

Research & Teaching Interests

The medieval and early modern Middle East, urban history, gender history, history of material culture, Islamic law and society


Current Projects

I am preparing my dissertation for publication as a monograph. My dissertation was a microhistory of a neighborhood in Cairo, al-Darb al-Ahmar, from 1450-1600.

Research on a single neighborhood revealed new insights into women’s roles as property owners, the interactions of Christians and Muslims at the local level, domestic architecture, and the structure of the city in terms of gates, neighborhoods and streets.

I have also begun to research the transition from a Mamluk court system to an Ottoman court system in early modern Egypt. Initially I will be writing a history of the notaries of the court of Ibn Tulun in southern Cairo.

Eventually this project will include histories of other courts including the city of Dumyat on the eastern Mediterranean coast of the Nile delta. This project will investigate the ways in which a local Egyptian legal culture was created from earlier structures and Ottoman legal cultures and mandates.

It will illuminate the court's intermediary position between the interests and demands of the empire and its bureaucrats and the concrete needs of the courts Egyptian patrons.


Courses Taught

  • HIST 2970: Selected Topics: Formation of Islamic Civilization 600-1000
  • HIST 2970: Selected Topics: Islamic World II 1000-1500
  • HIST 3970: Selected Topics: Gender in Islamic History
  • HIST 4970: Selected Topics: Life & Legacy of the Prophet Mohamed
  • HIST 4970: Selected Topics: Islamic Cities
  • HIST 5970: Selected Topics: Rise of Nationalism in the Middle East, 1900-present

1179 Chrysler Hall North
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2325
glazure@uwindsor.ca

Associate Professor
Graduate Faculty

  • Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, 2003
  • M.A. Université de Montréal, 1996
  • B.A. History/Art History, Université de Montréal, 1994

Research & Teaching Interests

Medieval and Early Modern Europe, European history, Spain, Renaissance, Atlantic world, humanism, empires, cultural history, cultural encounters, urban history, historiography, theory


Current Projects

I am currently working on a broad study of humanists and cultural elites in Seville (Spain), from their formation as a group in the early 16th century to their rise at the court of king Philip IV in the first half of the 17th century.


Selected Publications

  • “Posséder le sacré. Monarchie et identité dans la collection de reliques de Philippe II à l’Escorial” in Philippe Boutry – Pierre-Antoine Fabre – Dominique Julia (eds.), Reliques modernes. Cultes et usages des corps saints des Réformes aux révolutions, Paris, Éditions de l’EHESS, 2009, vol. 1, p. 371-404.
  • “«Un vehemente deseo de comprender la imagen de aquel famoso Templo se adueña de mí» : Seeing and understanding the Temple of Solomon according to Juan Bautista Villalpando S.J. (1605)”, Word & Image, 24, 2008, p. 413-426.
  • “Possessing the Sacred: Monarchy and Identity in Philip II’s Relic Collection at the Escorial”, Renaissance Quarterly, 60, 2007, p. 58-93.

Courses Taught

  • HIST 1130: Europe Encounters the World I: Facing Islam, 8th-15th century
  • HIST 1140: Europe Encounters the World II: The Age of Discovery, 15th-18th century
  • HIST 2010: Early Modern Europe
  • HIST 3160: The European Renaissance
  • HIST 4350: The Early Modern Atlantic World
  • HIST 8030: Modes of Historical Interpretation
  • HIST 8590: Selected Topics: City Cultures

1170 Chrysler Hall North
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2328
mmohamed@uwindsor.ca

Associate Professor, History
Graduate Faculty

  • Ph.D. University of Alberta, 2004
  • M.A. University of Khartoum, Sudan, 1989
  • B.A. (h) University of Khartoum, Sudan, 1985

Research & Teaching Interests

Issues of Historicity & Identity in the historic Maghrib & Bilad al-Sudan (Northwest Africa)


Current Projects

I am currently occupied with two concurrent projects inspired by the research for my recently published book: Between Caravan and Sultan. The first entails research in the British National Archives. I seek to recover the correspondence of two modern British authors, whose accounts continue to shape Anglophone discourses on the agenda of caravan traders like the Bayruk.

The second project revolves around the dialectic of ‘race’ and religiosity in pre-modern Morocco. I want to explore the ways the ‘textual’ caravan has shaped academic conceptions of the identities of pre-modern black Sufi savants.


Selected Publications

  • Between Caravan and Sultan: The Bayruk of Southern Morocco, Study in History and Identity (Leiden-Boston, Brill 2012)
  • Africanists and Africans of the Maghrib I: Casualties of Analogy,” Journal of North African Studies, 15, 3(2010): 349-374
  • Book Review: The Mamluks in Egyptian Politics and Society, ed. Thomas Philipp & Ulrich Haarmann, The Canadian Journal of History xxxv, April 2000: 196-98.
  • "The Golden Trade of the Moors Revisited,” Review of Lydon, Ghislaine, On Trans-Saharan Trails: Islamic Law, Trade Networks, and Cross-Cultural Exchange in Nineteenth-Century West Africa, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009) H-Levant, H-Net Reviews
  • Africanists and Africans of the Maghrib II: Casualties of Secularity,” Journal of North African Studies, 17, 3 (2012): 409-431.

Courses Taught

  • HIST 2200: History of Africa, 700-1800
  • HIST 3200: Africa and the Atlantic System
  • HIST 3970: Selected Topics: Colonialism in Africa
  • HIST 3970: Selected Topics: State of Apartheid
  • HIST 4200: Religion and Politics in Modern Africa
  • HIST 8590: Selected Topics: West Africa & the Atlantic System

1188 Chrysler Hall North
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2322
rnelson@uwindsor.ca

Department Head, Associate Professor, History
Graduate Faculty

  • Ph.D. University of Cambridge, 2003
  • M.A. Simon Fraser University, 1997
  • B.A. Simon Fraser University, 1996

Research & Teaching Interests

Modern European cultural history, German history, First World War, colonialism.


Current Projects

My new area of research, begun while a Killam Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for European Studies, at the University of British Columbia, investigates the development of a German 'colonial gaze' upon Eastern Europe, which began in the 1880s, and radicalized during the First World War. My areas of interest thus include: the social and cultural history of war and occupation, as well as both overseas and 'inner' colonialism.


Selected Publications

  • German Soldier Newspapers of the First World War (Cambridge, 2011)
  • Editor. Germans, Poland and Colonial Expansion to the East: 1850 Through the Present (Palgrave, 2009).
  • 'From Manitoba to the Memel: Max Sering, Inner Colonization, and the German East' Social History 35:4 (2010)
  • “Germany and the Germans at War”. Review article of five books. International History Review 31 (2009): 85-95.

Courses Taught

  • HIST 1230: The World in the Twentieth Century, 1914-1945
  • HIST 1240: The World in the Twentieth Century, 1945 to Present
  • HIST 1030: Past to Present: Understanding History
  • HIST 3020: History Workshop
  • HIST 4700: The Era of the Great War
  • HIST 8100: Studies in Postcolonial History

1167 Chrysler Hall North
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2329
spalmer@uwindsor.ca

Professor, History
Graduate Faculty

  • Canada Research Chair in History of International Health (2006-2016)
  • Ph.D. Columbia University, 1990
  • M.A. Columbia, 1986
  • B.A. University of British Columbia, 1984

I have been at the University of Windsor since 2001, and was awarded the Chair in April 2006; the University of Windsor and CRC Secretariat renewed the Chair in April 2011.


My principal fields of interest are

  • Discourses of health and medicine in the global age
  • Science-based cultural exchange between North America and Latin America
  • The production of the spectacle of health and medicine at Expo 67
  • The history of health, medicine, science and technology in Latin America and the Caribbean from the late 18th century to the present
  • The history of medicine in the Detroit-Windsor region

New Publications

A Canadian Treasury of Medical History

  • Medicine and Health in Latin America: A History, in the New Approaches to the Americas series of Cambridge University Press, 2015; co-authored with Marcos Cueto.
  • “New Deal for Nursing”: Windsor’s Metropolitan Demonstrator School and the Reform of Nursing Education in Canada, 1944-1970,” in Julie Fairman, Patricia D’Antonio and Jean Whelan, eds., Routledge Companion to the Global History of Nursing (Routledge, 2013).
  • State of Ambiguity: Civic Life and Culture in Cuba's First Republic, eds. Steven Palmer, José Antonio Piqueras and Amparo Sánchez, Duke University Press, 2014).
  • Among my current research focuses is health, medicine and the life sciences at Expo 67, with a focus on the francophone and anglophone physicians and nurses from the Montreal medical community who were responsible for the health and medicine theme and exhibits at the fair.  I am also preparing a critical edition of the scientific journals of Quebec biogeographer, Pierre Dansereau during his Brazilian sojourn in the mid 1940s.  My work continues on the professional, scientific and political dynamics of the growing community of Cuban-born medical practitioners in the last fifty years of Spanish colonial rule (1850-1900), with a focus on the relationship of plantation medicine and scientific racism to the building of a Cuban medical research laboratory complex and the push for Cuban independence.

Selected Publications

  • Launching Global Health: The Caribbean Odyssey of the Rockefeller Foundation, (University of Michigan Press, 2010).
  • “From the Plantation to the Academy: Slavery and the Production of Cuban Medicine, 1800-1880,” in De Barros, Palmer and Wright, eds., Health and Medicine and in the Caribbean, 1800- 1968. N.Y.: Routledge, 2009: 56-83.
  • From Popular Medicine to Medical Populism: Doctors, Healers and Public Power in Costa Rica, 1800-1940. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2003.

Courses Taught

  • HIST 2720: Modern Latin America
  • HIST 4030: Medicine, Healing and the Health Professions
  • HIST 4620: United States - Latin American Relations in the 20th Century
  • HIST 8040: Research Methods
  • HIST 8590: Selected Topics: Disease, Health and Power

1178 Crysler Hall North
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000 ext. 2327
gteasdal@uwindsor.ca

Assistant Professor, History
Graduate Faculty

  • Director of The Detroit River Border Region Digital History Project
  • Ph.D. York University, 2010
  • M.A. Université de Sherbrooke, 2005
  • B.A. Université de Montréal, 2002

Research & Teaching Interests

Colonial and Modern North American Borderlands, Detroit/Windsor, French North America, Canadian History, Native-Newcomer Relations


Current Projects

I am currently working on a SSHRC-funded project entitled “French-Canadian Migrations beyond the Borders of the St. Lawrence Valley, 1760-1840.” It focuses on the French-Canadian families who left present-day Quebec to settle on lands in the Detroit River region (on both sides of the “border”) between the British conquest of Canada and the beginning of industrialization.

Dr. Karen L. Marrero from the History Department at Wayne State University collaborates with me on this project. The other collaborators are Scott Cowan from the Centre for Digital Scholarship at Leddy Library and Madelyn Della Valle from the Chimczuk Museum.

“Unearthing Assumption Church’s Past” (working title): My colleague Dr. Maria T. Cioppa from the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences has conducted preliminary geophysical research in the vicinity of Assumption Church and has discovered that several remains of former buildings and all kinds of artefacts still lay beneath the ground.

Assumption Church was established as a Huron/Wyandot mission by French Jesuits in 1748. In 1767, the mission was erected as a parish for the local French-Canadian settlers, who began to build farms along the south shore of the Detroit River in 1749. Several buildings stood between Assumption Church and the Detroit River over time.


Selected Publications

  • Fruits of Perseverance: The French Presence in the Detroit River Region, 1701-1815 (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2018). http://www.mqup.ca/fruits-of-perseverance-products-9780773555013.php?page_id=46&
  • “The British Proclamation of 1763, Thomas Gage, and French Property Rights at Detroit,” A Place in Common:  Telling Histories of Early Detroit, ed. Karen Marrero and Andrew Sturtevant (Michigan State University Press, forthcoming). 
  • Co-editor with Tangi Villerbu, Une Amérique française, 1760-1860: Dynamiques du corridor créole (Les Indes savantes, 2015).
  • Co-editor with Robert Englebert, French and Indians in the Heart of North America, 1630-1815 (Michigan State University Press, 2013); published by University of Manitoba Press in Canada.
  • “Old Friends and New Foes: French Settlers and Indians in the Detroit River Border Region,” Michigan Historical Review, 38 (Fall 2012): 35-62.

Courses Taught

  • HIST 1030: Past to Present: Understanding History
  • HIST 2430: Canada from Early European Contacts to the Origins of Confederations, 1600-1867
  • HIST 2440: Canada since Confederation, 1867-Present
  • HIST 2460: Aboriginal Peoples in Canadian History: Beginnings to Mid-19th Century
  • HIST 2470: Aboriginal Peoples in Canadian History: Mid-Nineteenth Century to the Present
  • HIST 3970: Selected Topics: French North America, 1500-2000
  • HIST 3970: Selected Topics: Canada-United States Relations since 1783
  • HIST 4970: Selected Topics: Local History and Research Methods
  • HIST 4970: Selected Topics: Comparative Colonial North American Borderlands
  • HIST 4970: Selected Topics: The Peoples of the Detroit River Region and the War of 1812
  • HIST 5970: Selected Topics: French and Aboriginal Peoples: Trade and Alliances in Colonial North America
  • HIST 5970: Selected Topics: Borderlands: Understanding the Detroit River Border Region

1174 Chrysler Hall North
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2377
peterway@uwindsor.ca

Professor, History
Graduate Faculty

  • Ph.D. University of Maryland, 1991
  • M.A. Queen's University, 1983
  • B.A. Trent University, 1981

Research & Teaching Interests

History of class and labouring people, Atlantic World, US History, Native Americans, War and Society


Current Projects

"Artisans of War: Common Soldiers and the Making of Britain’s Atlantic Empire in the Seven Years' War." This study treats soldiers as workers within the war industry and argues that warfare in the 18th century was a major factor in state formation, imperial expansion and the development of capitalism.

The study will address such questions as capital accumulation in the New World, immigration, settlement, working class culture, conflict with Native peoples, the roots of the American Republic, and the construction of ethnic, racial and gendered identities. The book is contracted to University of Pennsylvania Press.

“Memoir of an Invalid,” a study of the experience of James Miller, a Scottish soldier in the British army who fought in the Seven Years’ War and American Revolution, and left a rare diary of his life making war.


Selected Publications

  • “‘black service . . . white money’: The Peculiar Institution of Military Labor in the British Army during the Seven Years’ War,” in Leon Fink, ed., Workers Across the Americas: The Transnational Turn in Labor History (New York: Oxford, forthcoming 2010).
  • “Memoirs of an Invalid: James Miller and the Making of the British-American Empire in the Seven Years’ War,” in Donna Haverty-Stacke and Daniel J. Walkowitz ed. Rethinking U.S. Labor History: Essays in the Working-Class Experience, 1756 - 2009, (Continuum, forthcoming 2010).
  • “Hercules, the Hydra and Historians,” Social History Online, 3 (2010).
  • Common Labour: Workers and the Digging of North American Canals, 1780-1860 (Cambridge University Press, 1993), winner of the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize awarded by the Organization of American Historians for the best first book in American History.
  • "The Cutting Edge of Culture: British Soldiers Encounter Native Americans in the French and Indian War," Empire and Others: British Encounters with Indigenous Peoples, 1600-1850, ed. Martin Daunton and Rick Halpern (London: University College of London Press, 1999, and Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999).
  • "Rebellion of the Regulars: Working Soldiers and the Mutiny of 1763-1764," William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Ser., vol. 57, no. 4 (Oct. 2000), 761-92.
  • “Class and the Common Soldier in the Seven Years’ War,” Labor History, vol. 44, no. 4 (Dec. 2003), 455-481.
  • “Venus and Mars: Women and the British Army in America during the Seven Years’ War,” in Britain and America Go to War: The Impact of War and Warfare in Anglo-America, 1754-1815, ed. Julie Flavell and Stephen Conway (Florida University Press, 2004), 41-68.
  • “Class Warfare: Primitive Accumulation, Military Revolution and the British War Worker,” in Marcel van der Linden and Karl Heinz Roth (eds.), Beyond Marx: Confronting Labor History and the Concept of Labor with the Global Labor Relations of the 21st Century (Berlin and Hamburg: Assoziation A, 2009)].

Courses Taught

  • HIST 4580: Early American History, 1600-1800
  • HIST 4970: Selected Topics; Hollywood's History Lesson
  • HIST 5970: Selected Topics; Studies in the History of Class

1172 Chrysler Hall North
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2341
mwright@uwindsor.ca

Associate Professor, History
Graduate Faculty

  • Ph.D. Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1997
  • M.A. Queen's University, 1990
  • B.A. University of Western Ontario, 1987

Research & Teaching Interests

Canadian history, Chinese immigration to Newfoundland, race and sports in Canada, public history, Canadian fisheries


Current Projects

I am working on some articles on Chinese immigrants in Newfoundland, first half of the twentieth century. From 2009-12 I was involved with a public history project on the Chinese Head Tax in Newfoundland, which included a monument in downtown St. John’s, and a photographic exhibit at Memorial University.

I was the co-director of the public history project, Breaking the Colour Barrier: Wilfred ‘Boomer’ Harding and the Chatham Coloured All-Stars, 1932-1939.  This website includes newspaper articles, photographs, and original oral histories on the Chatham Coloured All-Stars, a Black baseball team from Chatham, Ontario. This has led us to several other projects, including working on a monograph (with Heidi Jacobs, Leddy Library).


Selected Publications

  • Miriam Wright, The Chinese Immigrant in the City: Reflections on Race, Class and Gender in the Public Spaces of St. John's Newfoundland, 1895-1949, 2007, Acadiensis: Bloggin the History of Atlantic Canada, Invited.
  • Miriam Wright, The Rise and Fall of Newfoundland's Cod Fishery, ARGOS: Journal of the Maritime Museum of Ilhavo (Revista do Museu Maritimo de Ilhavo), (4, October, 2016)
  • "Aboriginal Gillnet Fishers, Science, and the State: Salmon Fisheries, Management on the Nass and Skeena Rivers, British Columbia, 1951-1961," Journal of Canadian Studies, 44,1(Winter 2010), 5-35.
  • A Fishery for Modern Times: The State and the Industrialization of the Newfoundland Fishery 1934-1968. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Courses Taught

  • HIST 2460: Aboriginal Peoples in Canadian History I: Beginnings to 1850
  • HIST 2470: Aboriginal Peoples in Canadian History II: 1850 to the Present
  • HIST 3030: Schools of Historical Thought
  • HIST 4450: Politics & Society in Industrializing Canada, 1890s-1930s
  • HIST 4460: The Making of Post-War Canada
  • HIST 8511: Modernity

Sessional Lecturers & Ancillary Academic Staff

209B Chrysler Hall Tower
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 3256
natkin@uwindsor.ca

Assistant Professor, History

  • Ph.D. Wayne State University, 1999
  • M.A. Wayne State University, 1995
  • B.A. University of Ottawa, 1991

Research & Teaching Interests

American history, 1960s social movements, feminism, Vietnam War, American foreign policy, Cold War, cultural history


Current Projects

I am currently designing programs and teaching courses that address the transition issues of first year students.


Selected Publications

  • Entries on Jeannette Rankin, the American Peace Movement, and the Fellowship of Reconciliation in The Emergence of Modern America, 1900-1930. E. Faue, ed., Vol. 7 of Encyclopedia of American History G. Nash, General Editor (New York: Facts on File, 2008).
  • “From Subculture to Mainstream: American Peace Movements, 1950s-1970s.” Mitteilungsblatt des Instituts fur Soziale Bewegungen (Fall, 2004).
  • Review Essay of Estelle Freedman, No Turning Back: The History of Feminism and the Future of Women and Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women’s Movement Changed America, in The Canadian Review of American Studies (Spring, 2003).

Courses Taught

  • HIST 1240: The World in the Twentieth Century, 1945 to Present
  • HIST 2500: Women in Canada and the United States, 1870-present
  • HIST 2610: History of America, 1600-1877
  • HIST 2620: History of America, 1877 to the Present
  • HIST 3020: History Workshop
  • HIST 3630: American History, 1945 to the Present
  • HIST 4970: Selected Topics: America in the Sixties
  • HIST 4970: Selected Topics: America at war in the Twentieth Century
  • HIST 3400: Women, War and Peace

pphipps@uwindsor.ca

Sessional Lecturer, History

  • Ph.D Carleton University, 2004
  • M.A. University of Windsor, 1997
  • B.F.A University of Windsor, 1993

Research & Teaching Interests

British Victorian History, European Women's History, Canadian Women’s History, historiography and historical method, feminist theory and feminist frameworks


Current Projects

My biography on a relatively unknown British Victorian educational pioneer named Constance Maynard (1849-1935) is currently under review by the University of Toronto Press. Maynard founded Westfield College in London in 1882. Westfield was the first English college to prepare middle-class women for university degrees which, in turn, helped to pave the way for women's future rights.

My interest is in exploring how Maynard's particular faith shaped her ambitions as an educational pioneer and her passions as a woman. Her life story gives us new insight into sexuality in general while enriching our understanding of Victorian femininity and sexuality in particular.


Selected Publications


Courses Taught

  • HIST 3030: Schools of Historical Thought
  • HIST 3360: Becoming Visible: Women in European Society
  • HIST 4080: Culture and Society in Victorian Britain
  • HIST 4970: Selected Topics: Britain in the Nineteenth Century
  • WGST 1300: Imagining Women (Women's Studies)
  • WGST 3060: Feminist Frameworks for Research (Women's Studies)

Department of History
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
adampole@uwindsor.ca

Adjunct Professor, History

  • Ph.D. Trinity College, Dublin, 2006
  • M.A. Queen’s University, 2000
  • B.A. Queen's University, 1997

Research & Teaching Interests

Irish history, history of crime and legal history, social and political violence, European history.


Selected Publications

  • Frank Rynne and Adam Pole (eds.) La grande famine en Irlande. Atlande (2015).
  • “Sheriffs in Victorian Ireland.” in Felix M Larkin & N.M. Dawson (eds.) Lawyers, the law and History. Four Courts Press (2013). 
  • “Sheriffs’ Sales During the Land War.” Irish Historical Studies vol. xxxiv no. 136, November 2005, 386-402.

Emeritus & Adjunct Professors 

2180 Chrysler Hall North
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4
(519) 253-3000, Ext. 2330
lhowsam@uwindsor.ca

www.uwindsor.ca/historybook

University Professor, History
Graduate Faculty

  • Ph.D. York University, 1989
  • M.A. York University, 1983
  • B.A. University of Waterloo, 1968

Research & Teaching Interests

The history of the book, cultural history of Britain, 19th and 20th centuries, history books and periodicals as print media, women in Victorian Britain.


Current Projects

I am working on a project called “Public History in Print Culture: England’s Past in Victorian Periodicals”. With the help of graduate student research assistants, I am searching the newly-digitized online editions of the vast corpus of magazines, reviews and other periodicals to discover how ideas and knowledge of the past were expressed in those media.


Selected Publications

  • Guest editor (with Jane McLeod) of, and introductory essay to, "Book Networks and Cultural Capital: Space, Society and the Nation", a special issue of Memoires du Livre/Studies in Book Culture.
  • Book Networks and Cultural Capital: Space, Society and the Nation
  • “Imperial Publishers And The Idea Of Colonial History, 1870-1916,” History of Intellectual Culture, vol. 5 no.1 (2005).
  • Imperial Publishers And The Idea Of Colonial History, 1870-1916
  • Past into Print: the publishing of History in Britain 1850-1950. London and Toronto: British Library and the University of Toronto Press, 2009.
  • “What is the historiography of books?: Recent Studies in Authorship, Publishing and Reading in Modern Britain and North America,
  • “Historical Journal 51:4, 1089-1101.
  • Old Books & New Histories: An Orientation to Studies in Book & Print Culture. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006.

Courses Taught

  • 43-200: Historical Methods
  • 43-301: Culture, Literacy & the Printed Word
  • 43-408: Culture & Society in Victorian Britain
  • 43-497: Special Topics
  • 43-504: Research Methods
  • 43-508: Studies in the History of the Book and the Culture of the Written Word

simmonc@uwindsor.ca

Professor, Emeritus of History and Women's Studies

  • Ph.D. American Civilization, Brown University, 1982
  • M.A., American Civilization, Brown University, 1975
  • Episcopal Divinity School, Cambridge, Mass. 1970-71
  • A.B., mcl, English History and Literature, Radcliffe College, 1970

Research & Teaching Interests

Women’s and gender history, history of sexuality, black history – all predominantly U.S. and Canada.


Current Projects

I am researching a series of conferences on marriage held in the 1940s at the segregated North Carolina College for Negroes, where black community leaders were working with white social scientists to promote a more modern form of marriage, including birth control. I am exploring how they saw this effort as part of a broader civil rights strategy in the context of their struggles for integration in education and employment.


Selected Publications

  • "Introduction" and "Courtship and Rites: American Dating from Dance Halls to the Internet," in Christina Simmons,  ed., A Cultural History of Marriage: The Modern Age (London: Bloomsbury Academic, in press)
  • Editor, A Cultural History of Marriage: The Modern Age (London: Bloomsbury Academic, in press)
  • Passion and Power: Sexuality in History (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1989), co-edited with Kathy Peiss and Robert Padgug
  • "African Americans and Sexual Victorianism in the Social Hygiene Movement, 1910-40," Journal of the History of Sexuality 4 (July 1993), 51-75
  • "Women's Power in Sex Radical Challenges to Marriage in the Early Twentieth-Century United States," Feminist Studies 29 (Spring 2003): 169-98
  • Making Marriage Modern: Women’s Sexuality from the Progressive Era to World War II (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009)
  • "I Had to Promise...Not to Ask 'Nasty' Questions Again": African-American Women and Sex and Marriage Education in the 1940s," Journal of Women's History 27, No.1 (Spring 2015): 110-35
  • Red War on the Family: An Interview with Erica Ryan
  • "'He isn’t affectionate at all': African-American Wives in the 1940s and the Problem of ‘Cool’," in Katie Barclay, Jeff Meek and Andrea Thomson (eds), Courtship, Marriage and Marriage Breakdown: Approaches from the HIstory of Emotion (London: Routledge, forthcoming)

Courses Taught

  • 43-249: Women in Canada and the United States, 1600-1870
  • 43-250: Woman in Canada and the United States, 1870- Present
  • 53-224: Love, Honour, and Obey: Marriage and Gender (Women's Studies course)
  • 43-361: Slavery in North America, 1600-1877
  • 43-362: African Americans/Canadians After Emancipation, 1877-present
  • 43-463: History of Sexuality in North America
  • 43-506: Studies in the History of Sexuality
  • 43-507: Studies in the History of Women and Gender

Yukari.Takai@uwindsor.ca


Bruce Tucker

Department of History

University of Windsor

Windsor, ON N9B 3P4

Phone: 519-564-2320

Email: tucker1@uwindsor.ca


Education

  • Ph.D. History, Brown University (1979)
  • MA History, University of Toronto (1972)
  • BA History, University of Toronto, (1970)

Research and Teaching Interests

American intellectual and cultural history, early American history, urban history and Appalachian migration, social sciences and the problem of inequality


Current Projects

Exchange, reciprocal learning and education: Chinese and Canadian connections


Selected Publications

  • 2016 “Rethinking Harry Caudill: An Angry Voice Muted”, Appalachian Journal 44, 111-16.
  • 2016 “Narrative and Numbers: Edward Bellamy, Tony Judt and the Political Economy of Inequality in the United States” (co-authored with Nadia Timperio), 46, 339-58.
  • 2012 American Culture Transformed: Dialing 9/11 (co-authored with Priscilla L. Walton) Palgrave Macmillan Press. London.
  • 2003 “Harry Caudill and the Problem of the Past”, Journal of Appalachian Studies 9, 114-46.
  • 1986 “The Reinvention of New England”, New England Quarterly 59, 315-40. (Winner of the 1985Walter Muir Whitehill prize).

Courses Taught

  • 43:200: Historical Methods
  • 43:261: A History of the United States I
  • 43:262: A History of the United States II
  • 43:365: A Social History of the United States
  • 43:503: Modes of Historical Interpretation

Sessional Instructors

Sessional Instructor
Chrysler Hall North 1165
(519) 253-3000