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Dr. Philip Rose

Dr. Philip RoseDr. Rose specializes in Environmental Philosophy, the Philosophy of Nature, and Metaphysics, with strong interests in the Philosophy of Technology and the History of Western Philosophy. 

His current research is aimed at developing a more Speculative approach to Environmental Philosophy that builds upon the work of C.S Peirce and A.N. Whitehead, especially as relates to the Philosophy of Nature and the ontological status of the Possible. 

Drawing heavily upon both the Anglo-American and Continental traditions, Dr. Rose’s long term project involves the systematic application of his speculative work in such important fields as the philosophy of nature, the philosophy of the self, argumentation and reasoning, the philosophy of technology, aesthetics, and ethics. 

Dr. Rose received his Ph.D. from Queen’s University at Kingston.

  • "Possibility, Spontaneity, and the General Order of Nature: Toward a General Theory of Emergence." in Essays on the Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents, ed. Adam C. Scarfe. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 2018.
  • "C.S. Peirce's Cosmogonic Philosophy of Emergent Evolution: Deriving Something from Nothing." SCIO, Revista de Filosofia. No 12, Nov. 2016.
  • "Spatio-Temporal Facticity and the Dissymmetry of Nature." Environmental Philosophy, Vol. 8. 2011.
  • On Whitehead, Wadsworth Publishing, 2002.
  • "Nicholas of Cusa: Human Nature and the Image of God", The Dalhousie Review, 82.1, Spring 2002.
  • "Whitehead and the Dualism of Mind and Nature", Process Studies, Vol. 21, No. v, Winter, 1992.
  • "Philosophy, Myth, and the "Significance" of Speculative Thought", Metaphilosophy, Vol 38, No. 5, Oct. 2007.
  • "Relational Creativity and the Symmetry of Freedom and Nature", Cosmos and History, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2005.
  • Technology, Human Values, and the Environment (PHIL 2280)
  • Metaphysics (PHIL 2500)
  • Early Modern Philosophy (PHIL 2760)
  • Environmental Ehtics (PHIL 2270)
  • Departmental Seminar (PHIL 4910)